Tag Archive: mystery noise

Yet another mystery noise. This time up north:

Canadian army investigates mysterious Arctic noise. Phys.org reports that the Canadian Army has been dispatched to investigate a strange beeping noise heard several times by Inuit hunters off the Fury and Hecla Straight. One theory was that the sound was made by marine mammals, because the strait is “usually frequented by narwhals, bowhead whales, ringed seals and bearded seals.” But the Inuit said that there were no animals left, as they all disappeared last year.  What is known is that the noise is loud and “it comes from the bottom of the sea.”  Although an initial investigation found no anomalies and the case was closed, the Canadian military decided to address Inuit concerns by sending two acoustic specialists to join a previously scheduled Canadian Rangers patrol to investigate further. And so the mystery noise remains a mystery, for now.

 

Mystery noise no longer mysterious:

The mystery of the ‘alien call’ deep in the Mariana Trench is solved. So, what’s the answer?  , wired.co.uk, writes that scientists at Oregon State University’s Hatfield Marine Science Centre, which named the sound the “Western Pacific Biotwang,” “likely represents the discovery of a new baleen whale call.”  So mystery (sorta) solved!

The cause of this noise is not a mystery:

not-quite-whales

Whales Would Probably Like Us To Make Less Noise In The Ocean.  Alasdair Wilkins, Vacativ.com, writes:

Whales’ haunting songs already suggest a complex form of communication beyond our easy understanding. Now it turns out we only knew half the story, as whales might also communicate through low-frequency vibrations they send through the water. Biologists only recently discovered this ability, and it might mean all our shipping and undersea drilling have been making a ton of unwanted, vibration-heavy noise for whales.

xxx

Yet another mystery noise:

ice-sheet

Canadian military probes mysterious Arctic pinging noise.  The BBC reports that the “Canadian military has investigated a mysterious pinging sound coming from the sea floor in a remote region of the Arctic.”  The sound has also been described as a beep or hum.  Whatever the source, the noise is scaring away animals, which is a problem for the indigenous people who live and hunt in the area.  The Canadian press has put forth a number of explanations including the following:

  • It is a sonar survey conducted by a mining company

  • It is being generated on purpose by Greenpeace to scare wildlife away from the rich hunting ground

  • It is caused by military submarines

Deepening the mystery is that mining companies, Greenpeace, and the military have either denied responsibility or have claimed no presence in the area where the noise has been heard.

Given how quickly Arctic ice has been melting, one wonders if the sound could have a wholly natural source like deep ice splintering or calving.  Thoughts?

Yet more mystery noises:

Mysterious noises plaguing Southern California town baffles residents.

Unlike some of the whistles or hums heard in other parts of the world, the mystery sound in Alhambra, California is described as a “loud, booming noise that sounds louder than a firecracker explosion.”  Residents say there have been about 100 of these explosions since February of this year.

Fox News being Fox News, the article closes with this inane tidbit:

[Town resident] Saunders is interested to see how long the booms will be a mystery. But whether the noise is something extraterrestrial, she expressed some doubt, according to NBC Los Angeles.

“I believe that anything’s possible, but I don’t think these are aliens,” Saunders said.

If we had to guess, the logical explanation would be police or military weapon testing.  But it’s just a guess.

Looks like the worldwide hum has a companion:

Mysterious whistle-like noise from Caribbean Sea is so powerful that it can be heard from space.

The sound, a whistle, is so powerful its vibrations can be picked up from space.  By machines.  Humans can’t hear it because the sound,  at “nearly ’30 octaves below the bottom of a piano,” is beyond human hearing range.