Tag Archive: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Scientists are learning to decode the sounds of icebergs

Sarah Laskow, Atlas Obscura, reports about what scientists have learned from “Listening to Icebergs’ Loud and Mournful Breakup Songs.” Laskow writes that seven years after the largest iceberg broke off of the Ross Ice Shelf in Antarctica, “the largest remaining chunk floated out into the South Pacific where, in the warmer water, it began to disintegrate.”  And for the next year, “the ocean was noisier than usual.”  Scientists from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) had suspended hydrophones underwater and they “were picking up strange signals.” Interestingly, the scientists “didn’t even know that icebergs made noise,” says Haru Matsumoto, an ocean engineer at NOAA who has studied these sounds.”  But now they do and they measure “the extent to which those sounds contribute to the noise of the ocean,” because “the sounds of ice could help them understand the behavior and breakup of icebergs and ice shelves as the poles warm up.”

Click this link to hear what the scientists are hearing.

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminstration announces new guidelines on ocean noise,

stating that the guidelines “show NOAA’s commitment to address effects of ocean noise on marine mammals.”

NOAA states that the roadmap “will serve as a guide across NOAA, reviewing the status of the science on ocean noise and informing next steps,” adding that it is “already taking on some of these recommendations, such as the recent launch of an underwater network of acoustic monitoring sensors.”   The focus is on the “approaches that [NOAA] can take with other federal and non-federal partners to reduce how noise affects the species and places we manage,” said W. Russell Callender, assistant NOAA administrator for its National Ocean Service.  Callender continued, “[i]t also showcases the importance that places like national marine sanctuaries have as sentinel sites in building our understanding of ocean noise impacts.”

Let’s hope that the movement from guidance to action is a short one.