Tag Archive: National Protect Your Hearing Month

What I did during the COVID-19 lockdown (and before and after)

Photo credit: Bidvine from Pexels

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

When I was in elementary school, a common assignment during the first days or weeks of school was to write an essay on the topic, “What I did during summer vacation.” I don’t know if schoolchildren today will be asked to write essays about “What I did during the COVID-19 lockdown” when they return to school in person, but this is my report, with a nod to October’s being National Protect Your Hearing Month.

What did I do during my abundant free time during lockdown? When I wasn’t working on noise activities I worked home-improvement or repair projects at our home, with a major project at my in-laws’ home as well. I won’t bore you with the entire list, but it includes:

  • Removing shelving and flooring from two large closets, patching the walls, repainting them, and installing new shelves and flooring.
  • Removing carpet from one room, patching the walls, repainting the walls, and installing new flooring.
  • Removing a warmer drawer in the kitchen, modifying the cabinet to fit the new warmer drawer, refinishing that side of the kitchen island, and installing the new warmer drawer.
  • Removing a trash compactor, finishing the inside of the cabinet, and installing the new trash compactor.
  • Cutting out wood rot in an exterior door frame, installing a new piece of wood, patching and filling the repair, sanding it smooth, and repainting the door frame.
  • Repainting the interior and exterior of the front door and the windows surrounding it.
  • Removing six exterior lights in front of the house and installing new exterior light fixtures.
  • Removing old water feeds for all toilets and sinks and replacing them with new shutoff valves and braided stainless steel water feeds.
  • Repaired the washing machine and replacing a leaking hose.
  • Reconstructing a large trellis at my in-laws’ house.

What’s the connection to National Protect Your Hearing Month? Every project was noisy. Demolition work is noisy. Power tools are noisy. And many hand tools, perhaps with the exception of a pliers or screwdriver, are noisy when used. Among the power tools used were a circular saw, a sliding compound miter saw, hand saws, drills, a nut driver, a hammer drill, a multitool, two different reciprocating saws, and a quarter-sheet sander. Hand tools included hammers, pry bars, crowbars, screwdrivers, chisels, scrapers, paint brushes and rollers, etc. Painting is quiet and plumbing is quiet, but all the other tasks were noisy. The only time I didn’t have my earplugs in was when I was painting or using pliers, a wrench, or a screwdriver.

And that’s my advice to you: If like many other Americans you’re doing repair and home improvement projects during the COVID-19 lockdownHome improvement projects are underway during COVID-19 please protect your hearing!

There is no such thing as temporary auditory damage, and the cumulative effect of loud noise will eventually cause hearing loss.

So even if you’re hammering in only one nail or cutting one board with your circular saw, wear hearing protection.

That’s my advice before, during, and after October, National Protect Your Hearing Month.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

An international perspective on National Protect Your Hearing Month

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

As I recently wrote, October is National Protect Your Hearing Month. In that blog post, I noted that hearing loss with age is not part of normal physiological aging but in the U.S. largely represents noise-induced hearing loss. That is also likely true in other major industrialized countries, e.g., those of the European Union and the UK.

An international perspective on the importance of hearing protection is provided by the Global Burden of Disease report recently published in the British medical journal, The Lancet.

As NPR reported, “the key to health … is wealth. (And education … and women’s rights),” with the latter two factors assuming much greater importance in developing nations. Additionally, as infectious diseases and starvation become smaller relative problems as national incomes improve, non-communicable diseases such as obesity, hypertension, diabetes, and cancer become more important. Ironically, in many cases these “diseases of civilization” are specifically caused by improvements in daily living and dietary intake.

The analysis was coordinated by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation in Seattle, which recently has received notice because of its coronavirus predictions for the U.S. One of the measures examined was the “healthy life expectancy,” abbreviated HALE. Another was Disability-Adjusted Life Years, or DALYs.

Sadly, when it comes to hearing, the IMHE and The Lancet’s editors still use the term “age-related hearing loss,” which wrongly implies that hearing loss is part of normal aging. As people live longer, hearing loss becomes a greater problem in all societies, including developing ones.

As shown in the Table in The Lancet article, DALYs from hearing loss increased for all populations, and especially for adult populations, since 1990.

This is a shame. Noise-induced hearing loss is entirely preventable, and no country, not even wealthy countries such as the U.S. or Switzerland, can afford to provide hearing aids to everyone who could benefit from them. Moreover, preventing noise-induced hearing loss is simple: avoid loud noise or use hearing protection if one can’t.

Because if it sounds loud, it is too loud and one’s auditory health is at risk.

This is true in the U.S. and in every country in the world during October, National Protect Your Hearing Month.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

October is National Protect Your Hearing Month

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

October is National Protect Your Hearing Month!

As I have noted before, I’m not a big believer in special months or days to celebrate or honor or remind us of people or things that should be celebrated or honored or observed every day, but the special days and months may serve as a useful reminder of the people or things. Hearing protection is one of those things that should be observed every day.

Hearing loss represents the cumulative impact of a lifetime of noise exposure, just as skin discoloration, deep wrinkles, and skin cancers represent the cumulative impact of a lifetime of sun exposure.

The basics of hearing protection are very easy:

  1. Avoid noise exposure, or wear hearing protection (ear plugs or ear muffs) if you can’t.
  2. The only evidence-based noise exposure level to prevent hearing loss is a daily average of 75 decibels.
  3. If a noise sounds loud, it is too loud and your hearing is at risk.

I would add a caveat and some scientific information to support my three points.

The caveat: The commonly cited 85 decibel noise level is not a safe noise exposure level for the public, but an occupational noise exposure level that doesn’t protect all exposed workers from hearing loss. Don’t believe the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders or misinformed audiologists when they promulgate dangerous misinformation with statements like, “[l]ong or repeated exposure to sounds at or above 85 dBA can cause hearing loss (dBA means A-weighted decibels. A-weighting adjusts sound measurements for the frequencies heard in human speech.) Auditory damage probably begins at sound exposure levels far below 85 decibels, and after only one hour of exposure to 85 decibel sound it’s impossible to achieve the safe daily average of 70 decibels for 24 hours.

The science: A literature review, now confirmed by research published this year, demonstrates that there is no such thing as age-related hearing loss. Hearing loss is not part of normal aging but largely represents noise-induced hearing loss.

More science: Noise exposure in daily life is loud enough to cause hearing loss. A 2017 CDC study showed that about 25% of American adults age 20-69 had noise-induced hearing loss, many without significant occupational exposure to noise.

Your ears are like your knees–you only have two of them. So protect them, because unlike your knees, your ears can’t be replaced.

Protect your ears and protect your hearing during National Protect Your Hearing Month, and during every month!

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

October is National Protect Your Hearing Month

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

October is almost over. October is also National Protect Your Hearing Month.

I’m not big on special days or months. If something is worth doing or someone is worth honoring or worth being concerned about, we should do it or honor them or be concerned about it every day.

My late mother taught me that. Many decades ago, when at our father’s urging we asked her what she wanted for Mother’s Day, she would snap:

This is what I want for Mother’s Day. I want you boys to stop fighting. I want you to make your beds in the morning without me nagging. I want you to clean up your toys. And I want you to come to the table for dinner the first time I call you, not the fourth. Mother’s Day is every day. You can’t be mean to me 364 days of the year and expect being nice on one day to matter.

So that’s my approach to special days and months, including my own birthday and the month of October.

But the special days or months do provide the opportunity to remind ourselves and others of something important.

For National Protect Your Hearing Month, our friends at CDC informed us that on October 19, it released a Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) entitled, “Use of Personal Hearing Protection Devices at Loud Athletic or Entertainment Events Among Adults — United States, 2018.” In this report, CDC researchers found that fewer than 20% of American adults used hearing protection when attending loud athletic or entertainment events.

Maybe this is part of the reason why CDC researchers reported last year that a large percentage of American adults age 20-69 had noise-induced hearing loss, many without any occupational exposure to loud noise.

Protect your hearing now to avoid needing hearing aids later.

Remember: If it sounds too loud, it IS too loud.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.