Tag Archive: nightclubs

Attention: DJs and clubgoers

Stoneyroads.com interviews DJ Dom Dolla about the importance of protecting your ears in nightlife. The article begins with the observation that “[m]any of your favourite musicians suffer from tinnitus, and the condition can worsen over time from exposure to loud noises.” Dolla, we are told, is one of them.  Dolla notes that the “average nightclub sits at around 110 dB (Decibels), often louder.” He mistakenly relies on then occupational noise exposure standard when he claims that “anything over 85db is dangerous for our ears,” but correctly adds that “at 110 dB you can accumulate permanent hearing damage in a very short number of minutes.” This is particularly concerning since “[w]e’re part of a generation that spends such a disproportionate amount of time around loud music.”

So what’s Dolla’s advice? “[G]rab yourself some 25+ dB reduction earplugs and wear those bad boys religiously.” And he tells DJs that they must “resist the temptation to pull them out when you’re performing,” adding that if they “keep them in, it’ll only be a matter of time before your brain cranks up your internal gain and you’re used to playing with them.”

Dolla gets it mostly right, but his statement that 85 dBA is the point at which hearing can be damaged is dangerously wrong. As we have reported here before, 85 dBA is an industrial-strength standard developed by NOISH and OSHA for workers, not the general public. To the extent that Dolla’s advice is directed towards club workers, quoting the occupational noise exposure standard isn’t technically incorrect, but that standard is never appropriate for the general public. Says Dr. Daniel Fink, Chair of The Quiet Coalition, “the only way to prevent tinnitus and other hearing disorders caused by exposure to loud noise is to avoid loud noise or wear ear protection if you can’t.”

State: New York City needs to improve response to noise complaints

Photo credit: Keng-Yu Lin licensed under CC BY 2.0

New York State Comptroller Thomas P. DiNapoli has released an audit showing a “growing number of noise complaints related to nightlife establishments in New York City,” with noise complaints more than doubling between 2010 and 2015. DiNapoli says that the audit “highlights the need for the New York State Liquor Authority (SLA) and the New York City Police Department (NYPD) to better communicate and crack down on bars and clubs with persistent noise problems.” Despite the doubling of complaints, “including tens of thousands involving nightlife,” DiNapoli’s auditors “found limited communication between the SLA and NYPD to address the grievances.” Incredibly, bars and nightclubs with “hundreds of complaints lodged against them faced little or no repercussions.”

Residents of the Lower East Side, an area hit particularly hard by nightlife noise, won’t be surprised by the report, as that neighborhood has become increasingly popular as a nightlife destination. In fact, residents there are working together to stop a force they see destroying their quality of life. Stacey Delikat, Fox5NY, writes about the residents’ efforts, and reports that party buses pull up at 2:00 a.m., the streets are clogged with drunks, and there is vomit on the sidewalks, something the residents call “just an average weekend on the Lower East Side.”

So now that the state and city are aware of the increase in complaints and the failure to address them, what’s the plan? DiNapoli recommends that the SLA “develop a formal process to access and analyze 311 noise complaint data….and develop and implement a formal communication protocol with the NYPD” and other public oversight authorities responsible for addressing noise matters that “pertain to SLA-licensed establishments.” DiNapoli also suggests that the NYPD enhance record keeping of noise complaints to improve “management analysis of response times and the effectiveness of the actions taken” and develop “system-wide procedures to follow up on establishments with high volumes of noise complaints” that include “periodic communications with the SLA.”

While better communication between the NYPD and SLA can’t hurt, the report states that although the SLA took actions against establishments with a high level of complaints, “actions were rarely taken (if ever) against certain establishments with comparatively high levels of noise complaints.” Rather, the report notes, “officials usually do not open cases based solely on noise complaints, such complaints are coupled with other issues (such as alcohol sales to minors or non-compliance with building codes) that officials believe are of greater importance.” Perhaps the report should simply have recommended that the SLA make noise complaints a higher priority.

In any event, within 90 days of the Comptroller’s report the SLA is obligated to report to the governor, comptroller, and various legislative leaders to tell them what steps were taken to implement recommendations, which recommendations were not taken, and why; the NYPD is requested to do the same.

Next up? The press release ends with a note that the Comptroller “is currently conducting an audit on construction noise in the city.”

 

Not surprising, but useful information to point to if you are told you’re being an alarmist:

nightclub-photo

Noise levels in nightclubs may induce hearing loss.  News Medical reports that “researchers in Southern California have found that the average continuous level of noise in some nightclubs is at least 91.2 dBA (A-weighted decibels).”  Again, this is not a surprise, but what is surprising is a statement researchers made about noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL).  Namely, the researchers found that “[c]lub goers may suffer noise-induced hearing loss from just one night out on the town.”  That’s right, if a club is loud enough, you could suffer a lifetime of hearing loss from one exposure.  Don’t be a statistic, if you are going to hit the clubs be forewarned and forearmed–bring ear plugs so you can have fun and preserve your hearing.

 

No surprise here:

Noise levels in nightclubs may induce hearing loss.  News Medical reports that a new study raises concerns about the noise level in nightclubs.  So, how loud are nightclubs on average?  The study shows that “the average continuous level of noise in some nightclubs is at least 91.2 dBA (A-weighted decibels).”  Should you be concerned?  Well, the study also shows that “[c]lub goers may suffer noise-induced hearing loss from just one night out on the town.”  In short, the answer is “yes.”  Click the link for more.