Tag Archive: NIHL

Treating hearing loss may help prevent dementia

By Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

A recent Canadian newspaper article discussing a report in The Lancet, the premier British medical journal, about preventing dementia.

The Lancet article highlights the importance of treating hearing loss for possibly preventing dementia. If you’re interested in dementia, know someone with dementia, or want to see what you can do to avoid developing dementia yourself, I recommend the Lancet article. It summarizes a large body of research in a readable fashion that should be accessible even to the lay reader.

There are many factors correlated with dementia risk, including genes, blood lipid levels, and diseases or conditions such as diabetes, hypertension, obesity, and factors such as social isolation and cigarette smoking. The association between hearing loss and dementia is well-known and research is under way to see if treating hearing loss reduces the risk of dementia. Despite only correlations, and no clear understanding of how hearing loss may increase the risk, the Lancet authors think the scientific evidence is strong enough to recommend treatment of hearing loss as a possible prevention measure for dementia.

Of course, the only treatment for hearing loss is hearing aids, with cochlear implants reserved for the more severely impaired. We think that people with hearing loss should use hearing aids just to be able to hear others, whether hearing aids prevent dementia or not.

That said, hearing aids are a poor substitute for preserved natural hearing.

Perhaps the Lancet article should have gone a step further and highlighted the importance of preventing noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) to delay or avoid the onset of dementia. After all, we think it’s significantly better to prevent NIHL than to treat it, and that’s simple: avoid exposure to loud noise or wear ear protection when you cannot.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

Experts: Hearing loss is on the rise among young adults

Photo credit: Stefan Schmitz licensed under CC BY-ND 2.0

and their personal audio devices may be at least partially to blame. Melanie Campbell, a professor of Rehabilitation Medicine at the University of Alberta, warns that young adults “may be destined to swap out their headphones for hearing aids.” The problem is that this cohort “particularly loves music, they love it loud and they have very few worries about the future.” Campbell notes that World Health Organization statistics show that “[m]ore than one billion young adults are at risk of hearing loss,” and “[a]mong people aged 12-35 years, almost half are exposed to dangerously high levels of noise from personal audio devices like headphones while four out of 10 are exposed to unsafe levels of sound at concerts and other entertainment venues.”

According to Campbell, the primary cause for this hearing loss these days is noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). What makes hearing loss particularly insidious, is that people generally don’t lose their hearing overnight. Instead, says Campbell, “[i]t creeps up and you gradually forget that you’re not hearing the door squeak, or you don’t hear people’s heels on the floor.”

To give young Canadians the information they need to protect their hearing and prevent hearing loss, Campbell has been promoting Sound Sense, a project led by the Hearing Foundation of Canada that spreads awareness about hearing loss in Canadian schools.

Spreading awareness about NIHL and how to prevent it is, of course, the the best option. Every school in the U.S. should regularly test students’ hearing and include information about NIHL in their health education programs. Given that NIHL is 100% preventable, the failure to educate children about how they can avoid NIHL is as insidious as the disorder.

 

Red wine and dark chocolate can protect against hearing loss?

Sign me up! Ok, a red wine and dark chocolate diet may sound pretty fabulous, but obviously one cannot embrace it as a way of life no matter how concerned you are about your hearing. And, in any event, Debbie Clason’s post at Healthy Hearing adds that while “a glass or two of red wine can guard against the type of inflammation that causes [noise-induced hearing loss], excessive drinking deposits toxic levels of alcohol in your bloodstream which can permanently damage your hearing.” As for the protective benefits of dark chocolate, it’s not the chocolate in dark chocolate that protects hearing.  Rather, chocolate “contains zinc, which is known for boosting the immune system and guarding against infections that plague the ear.”

So, as with most other things, enjoy some red wine and dark chocolate in moderation.  And who knows?  It may actually help to protect your hearing.

Click the first link above to learn more about inflammation, hearing loss, and how “[h]ealthy eating and exercise habits, combined with reducing exposure to excessive environmental and occupational noise, can help preserve hearing acuity into old age.”

The CDC issues report on noise-induced hearing loss

and the facts are frightening. The Centers for Disease Prevention and Control’s (CDC) current issue of Vital Signs focuses on the dangers of noise on hearing health.  Among other things, the report states that:

  • 40 million Americans aged 20-69 years old have noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). Hearing loss is the third most common chronic health condition in the US, and almost twice as many people report hearing loss as report diabetes or cancer.
  • 1 in 2 American adults with hearing damage from noise did not get it exposure to noise at work. Noise outside of work can be as damaging as workplace noise.
  • Too much loud noise, whatever the source, causes permanent hearing loss.
  • 1 in 4 Americans who report excellent hearing have hearing damage.  You can have hearing loss without knowing it.
  • The louder the sound, and the longer you are exposed to it, the more likely it will damage your hearing permanently.
  • Continual exposure to noise can cause stress, anxiety, depression, high blood pressure, heart disease, and many other health problems.

This fascinating if distressing report comes with easy to understand graphs and charts that clearly explain the dangers of noise exposure, who is most at risk, the high cost of hearing loss, how hearing loss occurs, and, most importantly, what can be done to prevent NIHL.  Because, in the end, one point is crystal clear: noise-induced hearing loss is 100% preventable.

Have kids? Protect them from a preventable health threat:

The Starkey Hearing Foundation has launched Listen Carefully, a campaign to raise awareness about noise-induced hearing loss.  The campaign was started to combat a growing public health threat.  Namely, that “one in six American teens has noise-induced hearing loss from loud sounds.”  The Foundation wants to alert the public to this health threat and prevent a hearing loss epidemic.

Go to the Listen Carefully website to learn the facts about noise-induced hearing loss and find out how you can get involved to stop it.

Maybe this will get peoples’ attention:

AC/DC’s Brian Johnson quits touring for good because of hearing loss.

Yes, nothing like the threat of complete hearing loss to bring home the importance of protecting one’s ears.  Let’s hope that AC/DC considers the damage inflicted on concert goers when they resume touring.

Safe noise exposure for the general public

Daniel Fink, M.D., Interim Chair of the Quiet Communities Health Advisory Council, has written a post for the Quiet Communities’s blog that tackles a question which is rarely addressed: What noise level IS safe for preventing hearing loss?

In his post, Dr. Fink discusses the seeming contradiction between a 1974 Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) determination that “a 24-hour average noise exposure level of 70 decibels (dB) or less prevent[s] measurable hearing loss over a lifetime” with statements from various governmental and nonprofit organizations that suggested that “a much louder noise level − anything up to 85 dB − was safe for our ears.”  In the course of researching the issue, he received a communication from the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) that explained where the 85 dB figure came from; the information in that communication formed the basis of a post on NIOSH’s Science Blog in February 2016 (which is discussed here).

Long and short, the NIOSH communication explained that the 85 dB was an occupational noise exposure standard developed to protect workers over a lifetime of work, whereas the EPA determination of 70 dB averaged noise exposure over 24 hours was believed to protect the general public from hearing loss over a lifetime.  As Dr. Fink notes that the clarification of the difference in noise exposure limits is important in setting public policy and protecting public health, and he concludes that, based on his research, “[t]he much lower 70 dB average noise exposure level is the only published safe noise level to protect the public’s hearing.”

 

NIOSH Science Blog clarifies difference between occupational and general noise exposure limits

Many people are confused about what is a safe noise limit for the general public because the only noise limit the public may have heard about is the 85 decibel recommended exposure limit (REL) that National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) established for occupational noise exposures.  Fortunately, the NIOSH Science Blog has just posted an informative piece* that discusses acceptable RELS for both, titled: Understanding Noise Exposure Limits: Occupational vs. General Environmental Noise.

The authors state that in 1998, NIOSH established the REL for occupational noise exposure to be 85 decibels based on an 8-hour shift for a 5-day work week, adding that the REL “assumes that the individual spends the other 16 hours in the day, as well as weekends, in quieter conditions,” and cautioning that “the NIOSH REL is not a recommendation for noise exposures outside of the workplace in the general environment.”  The difference between the occupational and general environmental noise exposures is that:

The NIOSH REL is not meant to be used to protect against general environmental or recreational noise; it does not account for noisy activities or hobbies outside the workplace (such as hunting, power tool use, listening to music with ear buds, playing music, or attending sporting events, movies and concerts) which may increase the overall risk for hearing loss.

The authors point out that a 1974 Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) report recommended 70 decibels over a 24-hour average exposure limit for general environmental noise (while noting the EPA’s caution that its recommendation was not a standard, specification, or regulation).  This recommendation was determined in a similar manner as the NIOSH REL, but it’s focus was on general environmental noise and not the workplace.  As the EPA report states, their recommendation “was chosen to protect 96% of the general population from developing hearing loss as well as to protect ‘public health and welfare.’”

The authors note that both limits “are based on the same scientific evidence and the equal-energy rule,” but “are designed to protect against different problems.”  As a result, the limit values differ because “the EPA limit was averaged over 24 hours with no rest period while the NIOSH limit is averaged for just 8 hours and includes a rest period between exposures,” and the EPA limit includes an allowance “to protect against exposures for 365 days a year versus the NIOSH REL’s calculation that aims to protect against work place exposures for 250 working days a year.”   The authors add that “the EPA limit did not consider cost or feasibility of implementation as the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), in accepting a NIOSH REL as the basis for a mandatory standard, [was] required to do under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970.”

Long and short, the authors conclude that the 85 decibel REL is a work standard that neither mandates nor recommends decibel limits for the general public.  Rather, it is the EPA’s recommendation of 70 decibels that provides the appropriate exposure limits for the public with regard to general environmental noise.

*The post was prepared by NIOSH engineer, Chuck Kardous, MS, PE; NIOSH audiologist, Christa L. Themann, MA; NIOSH research audiologist Thais C. Morata, Ph.D., who is also the Coordinator of the NORA Manufacturing Sector Council; and W. Gregory Lotz, Ph.D, Captain, US Public Health Service, Division Director of the Division of Applied Research and Technology (DART), and the manager of the NORA Manufacturing Sector Council.