Tag Archive: noise-canceling headphones

How to protect your hearing

This image is in the public domain.

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This short piece in The Guardian gives sound advice on how to protect your hearing. The Guardian reporter interviewed audiologist Gemma Twitchen, from the UK advocacy group Action on Hearing Loss, about how people can avoid damaging their hearing while listening to loud music, going to the cinema, or taking public transportation, among other activities.

Twitchen says that “[m]any new devices display the safe sound level and warn if you go above that,” and encourages readers to keep an eye on the reading.  She adds that noise-canceling headphones allow users to listen to music at lower volumes. This is important, because as Twitchen notes, temporary auditor symptoms after noise exposure indicate that permanent auditory damage will probably occur with repeated exposure.

I would go a step further and say that there probably is no such thing as temporary auditory damage and any symptoms after noise exposure indicate that permanent damage has already occurred. But I agree entirely with the audiologist’s advice to wear hearing protection.

And as we have been saying for a while, if it sounds too loud, it IS too loud!

Protect your hearing today to preserve it for tomorrow.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Two thumbs up for noise-canceling headphones

Photo credit: Frans Van Heerden from Pexels

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Geoffrey Morrision, writing for the New York Times, casts his vote in favor of using noise-canceling headphones when traveling, and I’ll add mine, too. The only downsides of noise-canceling headphones is that the over-ear ones are a little bulky, they are yet another thing to pack and carry, and it can be hard to find a comfortable head position with them on when trying to sleep. But in return, one has much greater quiet when flying.

Aircraft cabin noise is largely low-frequency noise, from engines and airframe, and most noise-canceling headphones do a good job of reducing low frequency noise.

I often use them on longer train rides, too, where again the predominant noises are low frequency ones.

The best noise-canceling headphones are expensive, of course, but if you are a frequent flyer, they are worth it.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

How to block out city noise

This would work. Photo credit: Max Alexander / PromoMadrid licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

In response to Winnie Hu’s article about New York City noise, The New York Times NY Regional reporter, Jonathan Wolfe, has written a piece on how to block out the city’s noise. To get some answers, Wolfe spoke with “Tim Heffernan, a writer and editor at The Wirecutter, the New York Times site that evaluates products, to ask for noise-reducing recommendations.” What follows is Hefferman’s recommendations for the best noise-canceling headphones and over-the-ear headphones, the best white noise machine, and, of course, the best disposable ear plugs.

In addition to the recommenations in Wolfe’s article, the New York City’s Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) suggests that apartment dwellers who live near busy streets with transient street noise consider the advice provided in the city’s “Residential Noise Control Guidance Sheet.” Says one DEP employee, “I use these principles in my own place.”

The DEP’s Residential Noise Control Guidance Sheet and Hefferman’s recommendations are sensible options for blocking noise that is intruding on your personal space. But we need to focus on the bigger issue, namely, keeping all noise in check. For example, along with recommending noise-blocking products, couldn’t The New York Times assign a health reporter to cover noise and its effect on health or report on why the federal government has abdicated its authority to regulate noise? (Here’s a hint: the Environmental Protection Agency’s Office of Noise Abatement and Control was kneecapped by industry after Ronald Reagan came into power.)

Blocking noise today may give us temporary relief, but it is a poor response to a long-term and significant public health hazard. We need government to regulate noise now to promote our wellbeing and protect our health.