Tag Archive: noise exposure

Noise exposure leads to hyperglycemia

Photo credit: PhotoMIX Company from Pexels

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This report from Diabetes Control discusses a newly published research paper showing that noise exposure was associated with the development of hyperglycemia. Diabetes Control notes that the study is only correlational and does not establish causality.

I have several issues with the paper, starting with the fact that the research was done in 2012 and only analyzed and published now. Occupational noise exposure was also strongly correlated with educational attainment and smoking, so it is possible that those factors and not noise exposure itself was the cause of the hyperglycemia.

But the results are consistent with prior studies done over the last two decades showing correlations between noise exposure and obesity and hyperglycemia in non-occupational settings.

Each similar report is like another tile in a mosaic, providing additional insight into the broader picture of the hazards of noise exposure.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Chemical earmuffs to prevent hearing loss?

Photo credit: Ben Dracup licensed under CC BY 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Perhaps I shouldn’t be surprised when researchers try to develop a more complicated way of doing something that can already be done much more easily and much more cheaply. This article in The Hearing Journal reports research on chemicals that appear to prevent noise-induced hearing loss in an experimental animal model. The hope is that in the future chemicals can be developed that when taken by humans will prevent hearing loss after noise exposure.

Such a chemical might be helpful for those who can’t avoid loud noise, e.g., soldiers or police officers, or perhaps for those inadvertently exposed to loud noise.

For the rest of us, that may or may not ever come to fruition. But a much easier and cheaper way to prevent noise-induced hearing loss already exists. What is it? Simply this: Avoid exposure to loud noise, and if that can’t be done, use hearing protection like earplugs or earmuffs!

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Hearing loss in older age isn’t inevitable

Photo credit: Matheus Bertelli from Pexels

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This review of David Owen’s book “Volume Control” from Canada’s National Post discusses the fact that hearing loss is not part of normal aging. Rather, most of it is the result of exposure to too much noise.

I agree with Mr. Owen, and with the reviewer.

My analysis of the medical and scientific literature, presented at the 12th Congress of the International Commission on the Effects of Noise, concluded that good hearing should last into old age. Unfortunately, modern life has become too noisy, with most Americans getting too much noise exposure in daily life.

Sadly, with noise exposure continuing unabated, I predict–and have predicted before–that hearing loss will become common in mid-life, not in old age, when today’s young people show the effects of hours of listening to personal music players at high volume.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Prof. Rick Neitzel on Apple-backed research, restaurant noise

Photo credit: m01229 licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

by David M. Sykes, Vice Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Watch these two videos with our Quiet Coalition colleague, Professor Rick Neitzel, University of Michigan. In one video, he’s does some interesting noise-exposure work with a Canadian Broadcasting Corporation reporter in a news segment that aired recently:

The loudest sounds to which this reporter was exposed over the course of a full day were in restaurants during lunch and dinner! It certainly looks like the restaurant noise problem is gaining public attention.

In the other video, he’s announcing a very exciting new research project for which he’s received funding from Apple:

This study will use Apple’s new sound-exposure app on the iWatch & iPhone.

Congratulations, Prof. Neitzel!

David Sykes chairs several professional organizations in acoustical science: QCI Healthcare Acoustics Project, ANSI Committee S12-WG44, the Rothschild Foundation Task Force on Acoustics, and the FGI Acoustics Committee. He is lead author of “Sound & Vibration 2.0” (Springer, 2012), a contributor to the NAE’s “Technology for a Quieter America” and the GSA’s “Sound Matters,” and co-founded the Laboratory for Advanced Research in Acoustics at Rensselaer Polytech. A graduate of UC-Berkeley with advanced degrees from Cornell, he is a frequent organizer of professional conferences in the U.S., Europe, Asia and the Middle East.

Good advice about protecting your children’s hearing

Photo credit: bruce mars from Pexels

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This piece from New Jersey radio station New Jersey 101.5 offers sound advice about protecting children’s hearing.

Parents should protect children’s ears from noise, just as they protect their skin from the sun. Sun causes sunburn, and over the years wrinkles, age spots, and skin cancers. Similarly, exposure to noise causes hearing loss, tinnitus, and hyperacusis. Both are hazardous environmental exposures to be avoided or certainly limited.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Does noise kill thousands every year?

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This piece by Richard Godwin in The Guardian discusses the health dangers of noise exposure, including increased mortality. The dangers of noise are well-known in Europe, where the Environmental Noise Directive requires European Union member states to develop and implement government policies to reduce noise exposure for their citizens. Writes Godwin:

Noise exposure has also been linked with cognitive impairment and behavioural issues in children, as well as the more obvious sleep disturbance and hearing damage. The European Environment Agency blames 10,000 premature deaths, 43,000 hospital admissions and 900,000 cases of hypertension a year in Europe on noise. The most pervasive source is road-traffic noise: 125 million Europeans experience levels greater than 55 decibels – thought to be harmful to health – day, evening and night.

Somehow, this body of knowledge has yet to reach this side of the Atlantic Ocean, even though the overwhelming majority of experts think that the scientific evidence is strong enough to establish causality, not merely a correlation or association of noise and health problems.

I am confident that when the public does learn about the dangers of noise for health–not just causing hearing loss, but also hypertension, diabetes, obesity, heart attack, stroke, and death–Americans will also push their elected officials for laws and regulations to achieve a quieter environment.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

 

Four in 10 UK adults unknowingly endanger their hearing on a daily basis

Photo credit: Gary J. Wood licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This report states that 40% of adults in the United Kingdom (England, Scotland, Wales) unknowingly endanger their hearing on a daily basis.

This finding fits neatly with Dr. Gregory A. Flamme’s report that 70% of U.S. adults get total noise doses exceeding safe limits and Dr. Richard Neitzel’s similar finding in a Swedish population.

This isn’t rocket science–noise exposure for the ear is like sun exposure for the skin. If you don’t want deep wrinkles, age spots, and skin cancers when you get older, wear a hat, long sleeves, sunscreen, and avoid the sun.

If you don’t want hearing aids when you get older, avoid noise exposure.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

Noise discriminates–heavier burden unfairly borne by the poor and non-white

Photo credit: Alicia Nijdam licensed under CC BY 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Noise exposure has multiple effects on humans–it causes auditory disorders, interferes with learning, and disrupts sleep, causing increased cardiovascular disease and death, among other things. A new analysis of socioeconomic, racial, and spatial variation in noise exposure in the U.S. shows that the poor and nonwhite have greater exposure to noise than wealthier and nonminority populations.

Life may not be fair, but governments have a responsibility to try to make it more fair, and to protect all citizens from harm: rich and poor, white and non-white, native-born and immigrant. Those who often refer to the U.S. Constitution often seem to forget this, but the preamble includes a mandate to “promote the general Welfare.” A quieter environment for all Americans would appear to be part of this.

This also happens to be current federal law. The Noise Control Act of 1972 is still on the books, even if the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Office of Noise Abatement and Control (ONAC) was defunded in 1982. Reasonable people understand that the EPA and ONAC will not be properly funded during this current administration, but at some future time the funding must be made available. Noise damages more than hearing, and it is simply unacceptable that poor and nonwhite Americans suffer greater noise exposure while the federal government stands by and does nothing to protect them.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

Noise exposure directly damages rat brains. What does it do to humans?

Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

The evidence keeps mounting, almost on a daily basis, that noise is a health and public health hazard. Just last month, an article by researchers in Italy found that noise exposure directly damaged rat brains, producing changes in DNA, neurotransmitters, and even morphological changes. (For those who might be skeptical of this report, there is an existing body of research on the effects of noise on the brain. I don’t understand the details of the newer scientific studies, and I’m always cautious because studies have shown that positive results get reported more frequently than negative results, but taken together with the new report, there is a large amount of research pointing to a direct effect of noise on the brain.)

The Italian study exposed rates to noise of 100 decibels for 12 hours. That level exceeds exposure levels for most humans–certainly for a half-day period–but probably not cumulatively for many who attend clubs, rock concerts, or have noisy hobbies such as woodworking or motorcycle riding.

Humans and rats are genetically very similar–experts argue about whether the rat and human genomes are 97% or 99% similar, and about how to measure this similarity–but regardless of the exact percentage, we’re not talking about applying data from a roundworm to humans. The basic similarities are there in organ and cellular biochemistry, structure, and function. So it’s very likely that noise is also a direct toxin to the human brain, with similar genetic, neurotransmitter, and morphological changes, and most likely at lower noise exposure levels, too.

So what can we do? The solution is simple: avoid loud noise exposure, and wear hearing protection if you can’t.

And one last thing–encourage legislators, regulators, and public health authorities to do more to protect us from exposure to unnecessary noise.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

Are loud concerts bad for Beyoncé’s unborn twins?

Tom Avril, Phillynews.com, writes about the impact of loud music on the unborn. Avril notes that “[r]esearchers cannot perform a controlled laboratory study, because it would be unethical to expose pregnant women to anything that might damage a fetus,” but he adds that there are “a few observational studies of pregnant women who work in noisy environments.”  Sadly, the conclusion of those studies is mixed. Avril cites a 2016 study on prenatal noise exposure in Sweden that revealed that for “women in a workplace with sound levels above 85 decibels, children exposed in utero were slightly more likely to suffer impaired hearing than children born to mothers whose workplaces measured below 75 decibels.”  But other studies, he states, did not find noise to be a problem.

Avril speaks to Lindsay Bondurant, a pediatric audiologist at Salus University in Elkins Park, who offers that while a one time exposure to a concert should be fine, chronic exposure could be a problem. Rock concerts can reach much higher decibel levels than one would typically be exposed to–up to 120 decibels. Catherine Palmer, director of audiology at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, explains that exposure is different for the fetus than its mother, because “the sound travels through the mother’s abdomen.”  She cautions, however, that “timing of the exposure may matter, as well, depending on the developmental stage of the auditory pathway.”

So, what should one do?  With conflicting and incomplete information, we would err on the side of caution. As Pediatric audiologist Bondurnat opined, exposure to the sound at one concert should be fine. So unless you are Beyonce, keep your exposure to loud sound to one concert during a pregnancy.  And don’t forget to bring ear plugs to the one concert you attend. Developing a practice of using ear protection in loud spaces will come in handy once your child is old enough to attend noisy events with you.  After all, it will be easier to get your child to wear ear plugs if she sees her parents doing it.

Update: Before this post was published, the NY Times reported that Beyonce pulled out of Coachella ‘Following the Advice of Her Doctors’.  Apparently her doctors advised her to keep a less rigorous schedule.  We like to think that they suggested some quiet time too.