Tag Archive: noise induced hearing loss

Football stadium noise still here for another season

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

It’s been years since I’ve been to a college football game. The last games I attended were at the Los Angeles Coliseum, one of the quieter big-school stadiums, during the Pete Carroll era at USC. But I have read about and written a number of stories on stadium noise. Here is the latest story about the stadium noise at the University of Oregon’s Autzen Stadium.

This article, like every other article about stadium noise, says the same things: the noise is distracting so the coaching staff makes the team practice with loud music being blasted at them. Why is it understood that the coach should “condition” his team rather than demand that the noise level be controlled? Simply put, crowd noise shouldn’t be a factor in a football game. What Coach Riley (and everyone else attending the game) doesn’t know is that if it’s loud enough to impact play on the field, it’s loud enough to cause auditory damage.

The Quiet Coalition is still waiting for the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and its member colleges and universities–many of which have medical schools, schools of public health, audiology programs, or all three–to do something to protect the hearing of their student athletes and those attending the games. At least this University of Tennessee audiology professor understands the problem, which is why she recommends that students use earplugs when they attend UT football games. Kudos Dr. Patti Johnstone! But rather than having students block the noise, why not demand that the university control the noise in the first instance?

And as this article shows, stadium noise is a factor in professional games, too. In fact, stadium noise probably contributed to the Los Angeles Chargers recent loss in Denver.

Should football games be decided on the field, or by the home crowd purposefully making too much noise for the visiting team to hear the play being called? Whatever happened to good sportsmanship?

Sadly, it appears the NCAA, professional football teams, and stadium owners won’t address noise until and unless someone sues them because they developed sudden hearing loss or tinnitus after attending a game. Let’s hope that happens before many players and fans suffer significant hearing loss or develop tinnitus.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

Here’s the best mass-media article on noise-induced hearing loss

Photo credit: rainy city licensed under CC BY-ND 2.0

By David M. Sykes, Vice Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Despite impacting 48 million Americans, noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) has languished in the shadows for decades. But that’s changing! Check out the 17-page beautifully illustrated article in the September issue of Real Simple magazine*, a Time/Life publication with 8.5 million readers nationwide (that’s eight times larger than the New York Times readership of 1.1 million).

If you’ve been looking for a “quick overview” you can hand to friends and family who fail to understand America’s unrecognized problem with hearing loss—whether it’s your kids’ and their constant earbud (ab)use, friends who can’t understand conversations when you’re dining out, or an elderly relative who’s stopped paying attention and is increasingly depressed—this article should get the conversation started. And if they ask “what else can I read about this?” Tell them to look at this issue of Scientific American, new information from the Centers for Disease Control, and this one-page Fact Sheet on the health effects of noise that The Quiet Coalition (TQC) published in 2016.

It’s clear that NIHL is, as TQC’s chair, Daniel Fink, MD, says, “a growing problem in America nearing epidemic proportions.” But there’s a lot of work to do to get people (including the nation’s leaders) to understand that this is a legitimate public health problem. Frankly, the European Union and Asia are far ahead of us on this issue.

In the meantime, take heart: major media are beginning to notice! Congratulations to the editor of Real Simple for recognizing this growing health crisis. We are extremely grateful that her magazine cited three of TQC’s Steering Committee experts in this piece–Rick Neitzel, PhD, Arline Bronzaft, PhD, and Bradley Vite–and also
described two practical success stories. We hope Real Simple will continue to cover this issue and give it the attention it deserves.

We have only one complaint: the magazine erroneously states that 85 dB is the threshold of hearing damage. In fact, research has shown that permanent hearing damage starts at noise levels as low as 75 dB; furthermore, non-audiological health effects, such as cardiovascular effects, can be caused by noises as low as 55 dB.

*NOTE: the best place to find Real Simple magazine may be at the checkout counter at Whole Foods or a local book store. Or you can get it here.

Originally posted at The Quiet Coalition.

In addition to serving as vice chair of the The Quiet Coalition, David Sykes chairs several professional organizations in acoustical science: The Acoustics Research Council, American National Standards Institute Committee S12, Workgroup 44, The Rothschild Foundation Task Force on Acoustics, and the FGI Acoustics Working Group—a partner of the American Hospital Association. He is the lead author of “Sound & Vibration 2.0 (2012, Springer-Verlag), a contributor to the National Academy of Engineering report “Technology for a Quieter America,” and to the US-GSA guidance “Sound Matters”, and co-founded the Laboratory for Advanced Research in Acoustics (LARA) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He recently retired from the board of directors of the American Tinnitus Association. A graduate of the University of California/Berkeley with graduate degrees from Cornell University, he is a frequent organizer of and speaker at professional conferences in the U.S., Europe, Asia, and the Middle East.

Protecting your teenager from noise-induced hearing loss

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This piece suggests that you may decrease noise-induced hearing loss in your teenager by limiting personal music player listening to 60% of maximum volume for 60 minutes. I suppose anything is better than nothing, but I’m not sure how one precisely measures 60% of a personal music player’s volume. And if the one-hour limit is repeated several times a day–or the teen doesn’t follow this silly parental rule–I can guarantee that this approach won’t work.

My children are more than a decade past their teens now, so personal music players just weren’t an issue when they were younger. And I’m not sure how I would address the subject, either, but one approach might be to take them to a hearing aid store, or point out older people wearing hearing aids (in this case, one of them happens to be Grandpa) and then to tell them that a hearing aid is in their future if they don’t turn down the volume.

It’s hard for a parent to keep teenagers from doing unsafe or unhealthy things which may have lifelong consequences. The teen brain just isn’t wired that way. And saying to a teen that occasional exposure to loud noise damaging hearing is ok is just like telling him or her that occasional unprotected sex, heroin use, or driving without wearing a seatbelt is okay too, when, obviously, they are not.

The real responsibility for protecting our young falls to governments. We don’t allow people under 18 to smoke. We set an age at which a teenager can get a license to drive a car. They can’t drink alcohol until 21. And maybe they shouldn’t be listening to personal music players until age 15 or 18 as well. At a minimum, the Consumer Product Safety Commission should require warning labels to be placed on personal music players, headphones, and earbuds:

WARNING: USE OF THIS PRODUCT CAN CAUSE HEARING LOSS

Yes, smokers ignore warning labels, but the smoking rate among men has fallen from about 50% in the 1950s to near 20% today. And at least with smoking the government has tried to do something to protect Americans’ health. The federal government should target the causes of hearing damage now, or risk almost an entire generation marked by hearing loss.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

Attention commuters: put down your earbuds!

 

Photo credit: Pedro Figueiredo licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

A recent article in The Hearing Journal should give pause to mass transit commuters who use personal listening devices (PLDs) to mask background noise. Michelle Brady, AuD, Suzanne Miller, PhD, and Yula C. Serpanos, PhD, write that “[m]ass transit commuters are regularly exposed to excessive noise levels,” and note that use of PLDs “adds further stress on the auditory system as commuters listen at high volume levels to mask the background noise encountered during their daily commute.” By cranking the volume in areas of high noise, they note, commuters are “creating further risk of noise-induced hearing loss” (NIHL).

What makes NIHL insidious is that it “occurs in stages across several years,” and “[a]s such, its effects often go unnoticed.” Until they can’t be ignored, of course. The authors conducted a study on New York City commuters and found that “mass transit commuters in NYC do not completely understand the consequences of hearing loss and the proper use of PLDs.” They conclude that hearing health professionals need “to do a better job at educating the public about the risks of NIHL and safe listening habits.”

We agree that people need to be aware of the risks of NIHL, but also think there should be a role that government must play to protect citizens. And, of course, PLD manufacturers need to work with medical professionals and government to design safe PLDs that won’t deafen a generation.

 

Treating hearing loss may help prevent dementia

By Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

A recent Canadian newspaper article discussing a report in The Lancet, the premier British medical journal, about preventing dementia.

The Lancet article highlights the importance of treating hearing loss for possibly preventing dementia. If you’re interested in dementia, know someone with dementia, or want to see what you can do to avoid developing dementia yourself, I recommend the Lancet article. It summarizes a large body of research in a readable fashion that should be accessible even to the lay reader.

There are many factors correlated with dementia risk, including genes, blood lipid levels, and diseases or conditions such as diabetes, hypertension, obesity, and factors such as social isolation and cigarette smoking. The association between hearing loss and dementia is well-known and research is under way to see if treating hearing loss reduces the risk of dementia. Despite only correlations, and no clear understanding of how hearing loss may increase the risk, the Lancet authors think the scientific evidence is strong enough to recommend treatment of hearing loss as a possible prevention measure for dementia.

Of course, the only treatment for hearing loss is hearing aids, with cochlear implants reserved for the more severely impaired. We think that people with hearing loss should use hearing aids just to be able to hear others, whether hearing aids prevent dementia or not.

That said, hearing aids are a poor substitute for preserved natural hearing.

Perhaps the Lancet article should have gone a step further and highlighted the importance of preventing noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) to delay or avoid the onset of dementia. After all, we think it’s significantly better to prevent NIHL than to treat it, and that’s simple: avoid exposure to loud noise or wear ear protection when you cannot.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

When “good news” is bad news

Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This article in JAMA Otolaryngology about hearing loss in young people age 12-19 is getting press as good news. Researchers at the University of California (both the Los Angeles and San Francisco medical schools) analyzed audiometric test data on young Americans from the National Center for Health Statistics collected by National Health and Nutrition Survey (NHANES). The researchers concluded that the prevalence of hearing loss as measured by standard pure tone audiometry had not increased despite wider use of headphones and earbuds to listen to personal music players.

We don’t think this is good news at all.

First, the researchers state that the prevalence of hearing loss in 2009-2010 is 15.2%. Hearing only worsens with age, so based on the data, it appears that about one-sixth of young people are likely to have profound hearing loss in mid-to-late life. If they were losing their vision instead, would anyone think this was good news?

Second, the subjects hearing was assessed by standard pure-tone audiometry. These traditional tests do not detect hidden hearing loss, which indicates nerve damage (synaptopathy) caused by noise exposure. Only techniques that are now considered research techniques will detect this early auditory damage.

Third, the authors note that there was increased risk of hearing loss in racial/ethnic minorities and those from low socioeconomic backgrounds. Isn’t hearing health an issue for this group of Americans too?

Finally, the researchers discuss the many limitations of this type of data analysis, which means that no definite conclusions can be drawn from this study.

In the end, the article generated a lot of “good news” headlines and in doing so has done a disservice to all young people, because those headlines and the cursory reports that followed downplay the dangers of increased headphone and earbud use. This is particularly galling and irresponsible when one recognizes that noise-induced hearing loss is 100% preventable.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

Hearing Restoration: A Step Closer?

Photo credit: Ronna Hertzano et al. licensed under CC BY 2.5

By Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

A recent report that scientists in Boston have caused human hair cells to regrow in the laboratory is exciting news, holding out the promise of hearing restoration in the future.

But it is important to remember two facts:

1. Development and then approval of this technology for human use are likely to be years if not decades in the future, and the technology will most likely be very expensive.

2. Noise-induced hearing loss is 100% preventable and prevention is either free or inexpensive: avoid loud noise exposure and use hearing protection (ear plugs or ear muffs) if one can’t.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

 

Why do humans suffer hearing loss from noise?

Image is in the public domain in the U.S.

By Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Why do humans suffer hearing loss from noise? The cellular, sub-cellular, and even molecular reasons for how noise damages the auditory system are known, but why?

In a fascinating article in The Hearing Journal, evolutionary biologist William Shofner, PhD, notes that humans and our animal forebears evolved in a largely quiet environment. Exquisitely acute hearing was important for finding prey or avoiding threats, but resistance to noise damage in the auditory system conferred no selective advantage.

Our world only started getting noisy as cities evolved, and especially since the Industrial Revolution. That is, our ears haven’t evolved to handle the noise, hence the epidemic of noise-induced hearing loss reported by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Shofner’s last paragraph says it all:

Why didn’t evolution make the ear more noise-resistant? Again, evolution does not proceed with purpose. Simply stated, the human ear did not evolve under conditions of high sound levels. Any genetic mutation that might have led to a noise-resistant ear was likely not selected because it did not provide any benefit for survival and reproductive success in the pre-historic acoustic environment of early mammals. Natural selection is an exceedingly slow process that occurs over many generations, and the susceptibility of the human ear to noise-induced damage shows how natural selection is unable to keep up with rapid changes in an organism’s environment (Evol Applications. 2008). Technology has produced an acoustic environment that has changed much faster than the sluggish pace of human evolution. This evolutionary explanation of why the human ear is so susceptible to damage at highly intense noise levels provides a valuable perspective that audiologists can offer patients to prevent NIHL.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

Millions of people don’t protect their ears

Photo credit: Quinn Dombrowski licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

By Daniel Fink, MD

Noise is a medical and public health problem, and yet people ignore it at their own peril. Most of us are exposed to too much noise every day. That may explain why the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that about 25% of adults age 20-69 had hearing loss, and that many people with hearing loss didn’t know they had it.

Which is why a recent article by Mark Fischetti in Scientific American,A Loud Warning: Millions of People Do Not Protect Their Ears,” is particularly disturbing. Fischetti reports that while “many people know that they should use earplugs or earmuffs when mowing the lawn or partying at the club,” they don’t protect their ears against noise at home or at work. If you click the link to the article, you’ll see a frightening infographic that very clearly shows that millions of Americans are at risk of losing their hearing or suffering other hearing damage because they fail to protect their ears.

Maybe if people knew that noise caused hearing loss, tinnitus, and hyperacusis–none of which can be cured–they might be motivated to protect their hearing and fight for quiet.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area.  He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

Experts: Hearing loss is on the rise among young adults

Photo credit: Stefan Schmitz licensed under CC BY-ND 2.0

and their personal audio devices may be at least partially to blame. Melanie Campbell, a professor of Rehabilitation Medicine at the University of Alberta, warns that young adults “may be destined to swap out their headphones for hearing aids.” The problem is that this cohort “particularly loves music, they love it loud and they have very few worries about the future.” Campbell notes that World Health Organization statistics show that “[m]ore than one billion young adults are at risk of hearing loss,” and “[a]mong people aged 12-35 years, almost half are exposed to dangerously high levels of noise from personal audio devices like headphones while four out of 10 are exposed to unsafe levels of sound at concerts and other entertainment venues.”

According to Campbell, the primary cause for this hearing loss these days is noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). What makes hearing loss particularly insidious, is that people generally don’t lose their hearing overnight. Instead, says Campbell, “[i]t creeps up and you gradually forget that you’re not hearing the door squeak, or you don’t hear people’s heels on the floor.”

To give young Canadians the information they need to protect their hearing and prevent hearing loss, Campbell has been promoting Sound Sense, a project led by the Hearing Foundation of Canada that spreads awareness about hearing loss in Canadian schools.

Spreading awareness about NIHL and how to prevent it is, of course, the the best option. Every school in the U.S. should regularly test students’ hearing and include information about NIHL in their health education programs. Given that NIHL is 100% preventable, the failure to educate children about how they can avoid NIHL is as insidious as the disorder.