Tag Archive: noise

Human noise impacts desert animals, too

Photo credit: Ed Dunens licensed under CC BY 2.0

by Arline L. Bronzaft, Ph.D., Board of Directors, GrowNYC, and Co-founder, The Quiet Coalition

Having written about the impacts of noise on health and well-being, I know that noise pollution is experienced beyond large urban cities. A small community may soon find itself exposed to intrusive noises if the motocross raceway proposed for that town is built. If built, a small airport may expose nearby residents to aircraft noise. Jennifer Ibarra, a student at California State University at Fullerton, wondered whether increased use of nearby desert land by human communities would impact desert animals. She was especially concerned about the noises that came along with human encroachment.

She set about studying the effects of noise on the eating behavior of birds and other animals. While birds and other animals found their way to the food study sites in her study, less food was consumed in noise areas than in no-noise areas. She found that in noise areas about 20% less food was consumed, and she considered this a considerable loss in food intake. Ibarra hypothesized that “nearby noise obscured the sounds of approaching predators, and it may have been risky to remain at a site for very long to eat.”  One hopes that additional studies similar to this one could be conducted to validate the findings and lead to suggestions as to how to protect desert birds and animals from harmful noises.

Iberra’s research project on noise, her ecology course, and a visit to the Desert Studies Center have motivated her to seek a career in ecology. She also notes that she was inspired by a most encouraging faculty mentor. As a professor of environmental psychology, I was especially pleased to read about this research project conducted by a college student and know from personal experiences with my own students how extremely talented students are. I wish Jennifer Iberra good luck with her advanced studies and hope to read more articles highlighting noise pollution studies conducted by college students.

Dr. Arline Bronzaft is a researcher, writer, and consultant on the adverse effects of noise on mental and physical health. She is co-author of “Why Noise Matters,” author of “Listen to the Raindrops” (children’s book illustrated by Steven Parton), and has written extensively about noise in books, encyclopedias, academic journals, and the popular press.  In addition, she is a Professor Emerita of the City University of New York and Board member of GrowNYC.

Noise and pollution increase as countries, states reopen

Photo credit: Ion Ceban @ionelceban from Pexels

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This New York Times article reports that gaseous pollutant emissions are surging as countries and states reopen economic activity.

We have covered several reports about the coronavirus lockdowns causing noise and vibration levels to decrease, but I haven’t yet seen a report about the effect of reopening on noise levels.

I wrote about the eerie nighttime quiet of a curfew beginning at 1 p.m. in the afternoon. A little noise may be reassuring, or at least familiar, but too much noise is a problem.

My own observation is that in the west Los Angeles area, noise levels are definitely increasing. Automobile, truck, and motorcycle exhaust noise can be heard day and night. And there are more airplanes in the sky.

It will be interesting to see what happens with noise levels as the economy reopens more.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Protecting your ears at protests

Photo credit: Kelly Lacy from Pexels

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This article in Popular Mechanics reports on the recent use of military helicopters flying low over peaceful protests in our nation’s capital.

Helicopters at normal operating altitudes are too noisy, and at 40 feet over the ground are dangerously noisy. Flash-bang devices being used by police are also noisy.

If you are going to march in one of the demonstrators protesting police brutality and George Floyd’s death, put a pair of earplugs in your pocket.

Because if something sounds too loud, it is too loud.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

The importance of reducing urban noise

Photo credit: Francesco Ungaro from Pexels

by Arline L. Bronzaft, Ph.D., Board of Directors, GrowNYC, and Co-founder, The Quiet Coalition

While the United Nations was formed after the Second World War to promote peace through diplomacy, agencies affiliated with the UN have been involved with other actions to enrich the lives of people worldwide. These actions include promoting mental and physical wellbeing, social justice, gender equity, child welfare, aging, crime prevention and control, and environmental health. To achieve these goals the UN has enlisted the services of behavioral scientists.

In June, the UN will celebrate its 75th anniversary, and it was, therefore, an appropriate time to release a book that examines the role of behavioral sciences in the workings of this organization. The book is titled “Behavioral Science in the Global Arena, Volume 1,” and its editors are Elaine Congress, Harold Takooshian, and Abigail Asher.

In the section of the book entitled “Supporting Environmental Health,” Melissa Search and I co-authored the chapter “Reducing Urban Noise.” With noise a growing international menace for cities worldwide, this chapter examines the effects of loud sounds and noise on hearing and overall physical and mental health. Strong research findings support the fact that urban dwellers universally are suffering from the harmful effects of noise. Although there have been actions taken in Europe, the U.S., and other countries to lessen noise, more still needs to be done to lower the decibel levels in our urban centers. The chapter also stresses the importance of enhancing quiet in our lives through urban green areas and parks. Quiet benefits health!

This book has also been published at a time when our world is coping with the coronavirus pandemic. Urban centers have reported less noise from construction, traffic, and nearby music establishments. Residents have also tuned in to birds signing, crickets chirpirng, and soft breezes. One hopes that the pleasures of these sounds, especially while experiencing anxiety and discomfort, will be remembered as we move forward to a time when urban dwellers will once again be engaged in activities that bring about higher decibel levels. Such memories of the good sounds around us might result in ways to lessen the din. Adversity can bring about creativity!

Dr. Arline Bronzaft is a researcher, writer, and consultant on the adverse effects of noise on mental and physical health. She is co-author of “Why Noise Matters,” author of “Listen to the Raindrops” (children’s book illustrated by Steven Parton), and has written extensively about noise in books, encyclopedias, academic journals, and the popular press.  In addition, she is a Professor Emerita of the City University of New York and Board member of GrowNYC.

The future of work is not in noisy offices, NY Times survey says

Photo credit: Rum Bucolic Ape licensed under CC BY-ND 2.0

by David M. Sykes, Vice Chair, The Quiet Coalition

The future of work is not in cacophonous offices, a New York Times survey says. Pandemic-related working from home has accelerated a pivotal, even historic, change: people do not want to go back to their old noisy, politically-charged, distracting, disease-spreading offices. Many–60% according to the New York Times survey–say they’d rather continue to work from home as much as possible.

Could this be the next big driver of “knowledge-worker productivity,” i.e., no commuting, no irrelevant distractions, no pointless meetings in airless conference rooms
with management bringing in the boxes of donuts as a concession? If management buys into this change, hooray!

The whole open plan office fad has really been driven by two things: bean-counters trying to reduce the fixed costs of providing workspace for knowledge workers, while simultaneously satisfying the perceived need by managers enjoy seeing and “counting heads” of everyone under their control by simply looking across the open office floor. There’s been plenty of talk for decades about the advantages of “teaming,” “collaboration,” “sharing,” “cooperation,” and “camaraderie.”

But the bottom line has really been about…the bottom line. Open plan offices save money by spending less on both fixed assets (buildings) and peoples’ needs for space where they can really focus and concentrate, and giving them instead a “hotel-style” chair amidst many others at picnic-style tables and shared kitchens with fully stocked refrigerators so they never need to leave.

Things are changing! Now what will corporations do with all of that empty office space?

David Sykes chairs several professional organizations in acoustical science: QCI Healthcare Acoustics Project, ANSI Committee S12-WG44, the Rothschild Foundation Task Force on Acoustics, and the FGI Acoustics Committee. He is lead author of “Sound & Vibration 2.0” (Springer, 2012), a contributor to the NAE’s “Technology for a Quieter America” and the GSA’s “Sound Matters,” and co-founded the Laboratory for Advanced Research in Acoustics at Rensselaer Polytech. A graduate of UC-Berkeley with advanced degrees from Cornell, he is a frequent organizer of professional conferences in the U.S., Europe, Asia and the Middle East.

Could noise be a risk factor for hypertension?

Photo credit: Kateryna Babaieva from Pexels

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Could noise be a risk factor for hypertension? This fascinating study from Chengdu, China, suggests that the answer is yes. The study design is innovative. The investigators measured bilateral high frequency hearing loss (BHFHL) and blood pressure in 21,000 workers, with an average age of 40. Hearing loss was a proxy measure for occupational noise exposure. Workers with greater hearing loss, as measured by audiometric tests, had a greater risk of also having high blood pressure.

The study is an exploratory one, and it is cross-sectional, i.e., the workers were not followed for decades and the study is based on one-time measurements of hearing and blood pressure. Other factors known to be associated with hypertension, such as weight and alcohol consumption, were not documented. And only a proxy measure of occupational noise exposure, bilateral high frequency hearing loss, was used, rather than actual noise measurements in the workplace. But the number of workers studied was large enough to provide high statistical significance, and the results were striking. As the researchers noted, “subjects having mild and high BHFHL had a higher hypertension risk of 34% and 281%, respectively (both P<0.001). Dose-response relationship between BHFHL and hypertension was found in both males and females.”

Studies done in the U.S. also show a correlation between occupational noise exposure and hypertension. The Chinese study may show a stronger relationship between occupational noise exposure and hypertension because workplace protections and their enforcement may be less stringent in China than in the U.S.

What are the implications of this study for public health? More than 100 million Americans have high blood pressure. At least two studies show that noise exposure in everyday life is great enough to cause hearing loss. Is it also great enough to contribute to the epidemic of hypertension in the U.S.?

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

April 29 is International Noise Awareness Day

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Wednesday, April 29, 2020, is the 25th anniversary of International Noise Awareness Day. Twenty-five years isn’t quite as big an anniversary as fifty years, e.g, for Earth Day this year, but it is still an accomplishment. The Center for Hearing and Communication started observing this day to encourage people to do something about bothersome noise.

One of the small silver linings worldwide as a result of lockdowns brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic has been the marked decrease in traffic as people shelter in place, with corresponding decreases in almost all types of transportation noise. Urban dwellers report they can hear birdsong. Of course, when everyone is home, noise from a neighbor who is also at home can be much more annoying than when it only occurs while one is at work.

In general, a quieter world is a healthier world for all living things.  And I will be observing the day by going for my morning walk and listening for the call of the neighborhood’s Cooper’s hawk.

What will you do to celebrate International Noise Awareness Day?

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Kids learn about noise and classroom learning from the experts

Photo credit: K.W. Barrett licensed under CC BY 2.0

by Arline L. Bronzaft, Ph.D., Board of Directors, GrowNYC, and Co-founder, The Quiet Coalition 

Noises from overhead aircraft, as well as nearby roads and rail tracks, impede learning in classrooms. Since I was the author of two of the early studies investigating the effects of outside noises on classroom learning, a group of students in Sharon, Massachusetts asked me to assist them with their research project which involved taking sound level measurements on the streets near three schools in Boston. They wanted to “see how much noise kids are actually exposed to when inside schools.” Dr. Erica Walker, Boston University School of Public Health, and Herb Singleton, Cross-Spectrum Acoustics, Inc. were their primary advisors.

In addition to reporting on the sound levels near the schools, the student team surveyed a group of elementary and middle school students to learn how aware they were of noises in their schools. After concluding that ”noise pollution impairs learning in children and affects schools in city neighborhoods,” the student team then made some recommendations to lessen noise in schools.

While the research conducted by these students supported earlier findings and recommendations to lessen noise in schools, this project is worth noting because these young students became aware of noise impacts on their own classroom learning and then decided to explore further how they could help reduce noise pollution in their town’s schools. Hopefully, these students will continue their interest in the harmful effects of noise and will join efforts to reduce noise in our overall environment. Their conclusion–“But the best solution is…Being Noise Aware”–makes me think they will.

Dr. Arline Bronzaft is a researcher, writer, and consultant on the adverse effects of noise on mental and physical health. She is co-author of “Why Noise Matters,” author of “Listen to the Raindrops” (children’s book illustrated by Steven Parton), and has written extensively about noise in books, encyclopedias, academic journals, and the popular press.  In addition, she is a Professor Emerita of the City University of New York and Board member of GrowNYC.

 

UK research shows trees help quiet your neighborhood

Photo credit: Markus Spiske from Pexels

by David M. Sykes, Vice Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Ever wonder if trees actually help create quiet neighborhoods? Lots of people assume that if they plant a hedge or a row of shrubs that will help control noise. Professional noise control experts usually say, “no that doesn’t work.” But the UK’s BBC reported recently on some research showing that trees—particularly larches and conifers—actually help screen out noise.

The researchers tested 76 samples from 13 different tree species. Co-author Jian Kang, University College London, said that “[b]eside emphasising the effects of vision and shade, urban greening should be considered as well to achieve noise reduction during propagation.”

Here’s the catch–it’s not the trees’ leaves that are performing that service, it’s their bark. In other words, the noise they help control is actually noise traveling horizontally, like road traffic noise. They won’t do much at all for aircraft noise.

Since it’s the trees’ bark that’s performing the service, trees need to be planted pretty closely together to offer much real shielding from noise. Of course, trees also provide other kinds of relief: they screen out visual distractions like passing vehicles, nosy neighbors, etc., and they provide shade from hot sun in the summertime. So if what you really want is to have a quiet, pleasant front or back yard, do two things: put up a solid wall to stop the noise and other intrusions–wooden boards fitted tightly together will do–then put a row of trees or a hedge between you and the fence.

I lived for three and a half decades in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and even though it’s home to two universities, Harvard and MIT, it’s an intense urban environment with
an incredible amount of urban noise. I have had an eight-foot-high board fence on all sides of a relatively small property (houses in Cambridge are spaced pretty closely together).
That wall provided privacy, security, and a measure of solitude, even when we could hear noise on the other side of it.

One subsequently famous architect, Philip Johnson, built himself a simple, private house when he was a grad student in 1940 (he had a lot of money and it was his thesis project). He started by building a 10 foot high wall right at the property line that ran all the way around the property. Into the wall he inserted two tightly fitted, locking, windowless doors one at the front, one at the side. Then inside the fenced enclosure, he divided the whole lot into a flat-roofed indoor area and an open garden separating them with a glass wall that enabled wide open views of the garden from any place inside the house.

Simple, elegant, actually quite remarkable. That’s how you achieve solitude and privacy in an urban area! The house still stands today. In other words, wooden boards work even better than trees if you really want to screen out the noise and bustle of the city! Put in some trees for shade and green space and you’re done!

David Sykes chairs several professional organizations in acoustical science: QCI Healthcare Acoustics Project, ANSI Committee S12-WG44, the Rothschild Foundation Task Force on Acoustics, and the FGI Acoustics Committee. He is lead author of “Sound & Vibration 2.0” (Springer, 2012), a contributor to the NAE’s “Technology for a Quieter America” and the GSA’s “Sound Matters,” and co-founded the Laboratory for Advanced Research in Acoustics at Rensselaer Polytech. A graduate of UC-Berkeley with advanced degrees from Cornell, he is a frequent organizer of professional conferences in the U.S., Europe, Asia and the Middle East.

Coronavirus has people howling at the moon

Photo credit: Joonas kääriäinen from Pexels

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

The Napa Valley Register reports that coronavirus infection has people howling at the moon. No, this isn’t a bizarre neurological or psychological side-effect of this serious and often fatal viral disease. Rather, one night a local resident started howling, on a spur-of-the-moment whim, as the moon rose. Neighbors joined him. It is now a nightly ritual.

At 8 p.m., people isolated in their homes go outside and howl at each other for 5 minutes, to show their support for health care workers, to let off steam, and also to connect with their neighbors in an ancient and soulful way.

As the Register reports:

“It’s practically silent for 23 hours and 55 minutes a day,” said Amy Kalish, an artist who lives in the beautiful but quiet foothills of Mt. Tamalpais. But for five minutes starting at 8 every night, she said, “we get out there with our 14-year-old son and our weird little rescue dog, and we let loose.”

I usually don’t like noise, especially not nighttime noise, but I’ll make an exception in this case, at this stressful time, for the folks in Marin County. And for those in Italy who sing from their balconies, and any others around the world who find a few moments of relief by making a little bit of noise once a day.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.