Tag Archive: noisy

Fast food delivery by drones is going to be so awesome

Photo credit: www.routexl.com licensed under CC BY 2.0

Except when it isn’t. No surprise, food delivery drones in Australia driving people mad. The problem, of course, is the high-pitched buzzing sound the drones make as they scurry around. Feilidh Dwye, WeTalkUAV.com, writes that one woman said “she would take her kids away from the house several hours a week, just to escape the noise. ‘With the windows closed, even with double glazing, you can hear the drones,'” she added.

So imagine fleets of drones large enough to deliver a couple of pizzas and a six-pack of beer and think about how horrific the constant high-pitched buzzing will be. Just because some Silicon Valley sociopath has figured out another way to make a billion providing a “service” no one needs, doesn’t mean we have to accept it. The days of moving fast and breaking things is over.

Meanwhile, in France…

Photo credit: G.M. Briggs (a game of pétanque in Bryant Park, NYC)

The Local France reports that a French mayor has banned ‘noisy’ pétanque playing  during “anti-social hours.” Seems harsh, butan “official document” notes that “the activity of pétanque playing causes repeated noise such as rattling balls, accompanied by the sound of loud voices and screams.” Anyone who has been in a sports bar during an “important” game will surely understand.

In any event, the mayor’s ban is reasonable–it is only from 11:00 p.m. to 8:00 a.m.–and exceptions will be considered.

Is Boston getting too noisy?

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Is Boston getting too noisy? The Boston Curbed site has asked its readers to weigh in.

It’s been a few years since I’ve visited Boston, so I don’t know if it’s quieter than other similar-sized American cities, but my guess is that the answer will be “yes.”

Urban noise is a major health problem, causing hearing loss in urban dwellers and non-auditory health problems–hypertension, diabetes, heart disease, stroke, and death.

Much if not most of urban noise is transportation noise–aircraft noise, as Boston Curbed points out, road traffic noise, and for those living near tracks railroad noise–but music from restaurants, bars, and clubs for those living near them, horn-based alerts, and any other noise that disrupts sleep is a health hazard as well.

We can’t return to a bucolic rural past, so noise is an inevitable part of modern life, but there is much that can be done relatively inexpensively to turn down the volume of modern life.

Starting literally with turning down the volume of amplified music in restaurants and stores, but also in terms of enforcement of vehicle sound laws, street plantings, and many other urban design features.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

Tips on fixing annoying noise issues at home

 

Photo credit: FWStudio from Pexels

Nancy Mitchell, Apartment Therapy, offers tips on how to quiet five annoying noises at home, from squeaky floorboards and a creaky door to a noisy radiator.  Click the link to learn about what you can do to make your home a quieter, relaxing oasis.

Quieter kitchens are possible

Photo credit: Bill Wilson licensed under CC BY 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This article is about making commercial kitchens quieter but the same principles apply to home kitchens.

Noise from blenders, mixers, and clanging pots and pans is loud enough to cause hearing damage.

We should probably put in our earplugs before kitchen appliances, and shouldn’t turn up the music loud enough to be heard over them!

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

Update: A small but not insignificant noise victory

Photo credit: mjmonty licensed under CC BY 2.0

Last September we told you that Google–finally–was going to block noisy autoplay videos in Chrome in January 2018.  But January came, and autoplay persisted. Until now.

The Guardian reports that “one of the most irritating things about the modern web” is done.

A small victory indeed.

It’s noisy out there!

Photo credit: Marc Smith licensed under CC BY 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This piece by author Teddy Wayne in the New York Times discusses “the cacophony produced by today’s mobile phone or tablet” and how we have somehow become inured to it. I’m not sure I understand all the points made, but I agree with this statement: “It’s noisy as heck out there.”

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

 

Google defeated by Brooklyn

Photo credit: dumbonyc licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

But the Pixel buds weren’t a total failure, as the duo found the translator worked better in quiet rooms. Which is great if you are traveling to a mythical land of quiet and the local language is preloaded in the accompanying app, but not so much for the real world.
Maybe instead of relying on some hardware and an app to do the heavy lifting, one could struggle with a phrase book and charm/offend the locals like people have been doing forever? Personally, we think there shouldn’t be a “tech solution” for everything. That said, hey Google, how about working on bringing some quiet to city streets? It’s in your self-interest, after all.

A small but not insignificant noise victory

Polly wants some quiet!          Photo credit: Julie R licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

Brad Chacos, PCWorld, reports that “Google Chrome will start blocking noisy autoplay videos in January.” Why? Because Google acknowledges that “[o]ne of the most frequent user concerns is unexpected media playback, which can use data, consume power, and make unwanted noise while browsing.” “Unexpected media playback” being business-speak for crappy and annoying ads.

Chrome will also stop showing ads that are not compliant with the Better Ads Standards.

And the world heaved a sigh of relief.