Tag Archive: personal sound amplification products

Harvard Medical School looks at hearing and brain health

Photo credit: A Health Blog licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

by David M. Sykes, Vice Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Harvard Medical School publishes a number of useful, consumer-oriented newsletters and blogs on issues related to health. Sometimes they touch on noise-induced hearing loss and other hearing-related concerns. In this recent blog, James Maple, MD, discusses hearing health and its relationship to brain function. If you’re looking for some insight into this issue that avoids the hype, this is a good place to start. Research has recently shown that there is a clear correlation between diminished hearing and decline in cognitive function. Research is ongoing to determine whether there is a clear causal link between the two and how it might work. What is clear is that that preventing hearing loss is important.

An earlier article in this same publication gives an overview of the emerging market for personal sound amplification products, a market that opened last month thanks to the Warren-Grassley Act passed in 2017 and signed into law in 2018.  This law enables high tech “hearing assistive devices” to be sold over the counter without a prescription at drug stores, via online stores, etc.—for 1/10th the price of typical hearing aids. So now for a few hundred dollars you can purchase hearing assistive devices, try them out, and decide whether they’ll help you (or someone you know whom you suspect needs them). This article provides a useful, non-hyped description of PSAPs that makes good background reading before you begin shopping.

David Sykes chairs several professional organizations in acoustical science: QCI Healthcare Acoustics Project, ANSI Committee S12-WG44, the Rothschild Foundation Task Force on Acoustics, and the FGI Acoustics Committee. He is lead author of “Sound & Vibration 2.0” (Springer, 2012), a contributor to the NAE’s “Technology for a Quieter America” and the GSA’s “Sound Matters,” and co-founded the Laboratory for Advanced Research in Acoustics at Rensselaer Polytech. A graduate of UC-Berkeley with advanced degrees from Cornell, he is a frequent organizer of professional conferences in the U.S., Europe, Asia and the Middle East.

Starting January, help comes to the hard of hearing at your local drug store

Photo credit: Kateweb licensed under CC BY 2.0

by David M. Sykes, Vice Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This New York Times article is a wake-up call to all Americans with hearing loss: Starting January 2020, and for 1/10th the price of conventional–and ugly–hearing aids, you can buy “hearing assistive devices” at your local drug store or directly online. The innovation economy has finally come to the hidebound hearing aid industry!

And we can thank a genuinely bi-partisan team in Congress for making this happen. Charles Grassley, Republican from Iowa, and Elizabeth Warren, Democrat from Massachusetts, teamed up in late 2016 to write the “Over the Counter Hearing Aid Act,” pushed it through both houses of Congress, and in 2017 convinced President Trump to sign it.

Thank you Senators Grassley and Warren!

What this Act does is tell the FDA to keep its regulatory hands off of a new class of hearing-assistive devices called “personal sound amplification products,” or PSAPs. PSAPs are miniaturized, multi-featured wireless high-tech in-ear devices that do lots of things conventional hearing aids don’t do, and all for about 1/10th the price of conventional hearing aids.

Maybe deregulation works after all!  In this case, it’s good-old-fashioned bi-partisanship that got the deal done.

So if you or a loved one really need hearing aids but haven’t been able or willing to spend the $5,000 to $10,000 the hearing aid cartel has been charging, now’s your chance to tune into the world of sounds you or they have been missing. Check it out!

David Sykes chairs several professional organizations in acoustical science: QCI Healthcare Acoustics Project, ANSI Committee S12-WG44, the Rothschild Foundation Task Force on Acoustics, and the FGI Acoustics Committee. He is lead author of “Sound & Vibration 2.0” (Springer, 2012), a contributor to the NAE’s “Technology for a Quieter America” and the GSA’s “Sound Matters,” and co-founded the Laboratory for Advanced Research in Acoustics at Rensselaer Polytech. A graduate of UC-Berkeley with advanced degrees from Cornell, he is a frequent organizer of professional conferences in the U.S., Europe, Asia and the Middle East.

If you are interested in personal sound control, check out

Nuheara’s IQbuds

this Fast Company review of Nuheara’s IQbuds. Sean Captain reviews Nuheara’s IQbuds, another player in the personal sound control market. Captain states that he has good hearing, but finds stepping into a loud bar or restaurant disconcerting.  Says Captain, “[n]ot only does the noise frazzle my nerves, I get exhausted trying to discern voices from background clatter.”  Oh, we understand.

Enter Nuheara’s IQbuds, a new class of smart Bluetooth wireless earbuds priced at $299 a pair, that allows users to control their immediate soundscape. So, how do the IQbuds work?  Captain writes:

Equipped with built-in microphones, the IQbuds process ambient audio in real time before feeding it to your ears. That allows you to customize how you hear, such as muting background noise, boosting the voices of people you’re talking to, or layering streaming music with ambient sounds so that both come through clearly.

While Captain notes that the sound quality isn’t quite there yet, his test run of the IQbuds in a loud restaurant convinces him of their value.  Captain writes that “[n]o matter what Cannington (Nuheara’s co-founder) sounds like through the IQbuds, it’s so much better than straining to hear him without them.”

Click this link to read Captain’s review of Doppler Lab’s HERE One, a competing earbud manufactured by Nuheara’s “well-funded rival.”  Reading both reviews, it’s clear that there is room for improvement, but with each iteration HERE One and IQbuds have and should continue to get better, more intuitive, and easier to use.  It’s an exciting product for people who find it increasingly difficult to navigate noisy environments, and may offer some reasonable self-help to people with hearing loss who can’t afford hearing aids.

Cheaper and better hearing aids are coming:

Why isn’t there a Warby Parker for hearing aids?  Sean Captain, writing for Fast Company, looks at the current market for hearing aids, a market that is dominated by six companies charging anywhere from $4,500 and upward a pair–out of reach for most people who need them–and the new players who are shaking up this industry.  First, Captain introduces us to “Audra Renyi, a 34-year-old former investment banker who’s been a hearing care advocate since 2007, [who] is launching a company called Hearing Access World that aims to cut the price of hearing aids by 75%.”   He writes:

Renyi knows her market well as executive director of World Wide Hearing. The Montreal-based nonprofit provides testing and low-cost hearing aids in poor countries like Guatemala and Vietnam. She hopes to bring prices down globally by playing directly in the market with her new social venture.

Interestingly, there are other players interested in this market who aren’t from the nonprofit world, namely tech startups. These startups are avoiding the cost, in both time and legal fees, they would have to bear navigating the Food and Drug Administration for approval of a new hearing device by selling their products as consumer electronic components.  Captain reports that:

While hearing aid sales are minuscule, consumer electronics companies are selling hundreds of millions of audio devices, such as Bluetooth headsets, that do many of the same things. Mass-market CE components are going into devices called personal sound amplification products, or PSAPs, which have become unofficial budget hearing aids.

Captain looks at one startup offering a PSAP, Doppler Labs.  Doppler Labs started out with a Kickstarter campaign for their product Here Active Listening, a $249 set of AI-driven wireless earbuds.  The earbuds “recognize and filter ambient sounds, such as bringing down background noise in a subway or boosting voices during a conversation, [and a] smartphone app lets users pick filters and effects (like simulating the ambience of a concert hall), adjust volume, and tweak a five-band equalizer.”  Doppler Labs is coming out with a new product, HERE One, which is shipping in time for the 2016 holiday season.

Captain reviewed the then current model of HERE One and had some reservations, but he didn’t have the opportunity to review the latest iteration and the Doppler spokeswoman offered that he may have needed different sized tips to better fit his ear canals.  Long and short, PSAPs are in their infancy, but the future looks promising for them and us.  As Captain states:

As consumer electronics companies nudge into the hearing-aid space with PSAPs, and as hearing-aid companies nudge into the CE space, a new wearable tech category may be emerging. Called “hearables” by their boosters, the gadgets could encompass a range of over-the-counter, in-ear devices that allow people to hear better—either by making up for diagnosed hearing deficiency or tweaking how live music and voices sound.

In the end, people with hearing loss who have been denied access to hearing aids due to their prohibitive cost should very soon be able to purchase reasonably priced PSAPs that will give them some relief.  While it would be better, of course, for everyone with hearing loss to be properly fitted with hearing aids that are adjusted by audiologists, this cheaper alternative addresses a critical need now.  For those who feel isolated by hearing loss, PSAPs will be a godsend.

Click this link for the full article to read about the full range of products and services that are or will be available shortly.