Tag Archive: Science Daily

The importance of sound in understanding our past

 

Photo credit: Martin Belam licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

Science Daily reports that many attempts have been made “to explain how past people experienced their wider world,” but those attempts have primarily “focused on sight at the expense of sound.” But things are changing, as “researchers from the University at Albany and the University at Buffalo have developed a tool that puts sound back into the ancient landscape.” The researchers “use[d] GIS technology to advance a largely theoretical discussion into a modeled sensory experience to explore how people may have heard their surroundings throughout an entire archaeological landscape, or soundscape.”

Science Daily writes that the “attempt to infuse character into the material world and incorporate the relationship between people and their surroundings is part of what’s called phenomenology.” Says Kristy Primeau, an archaeologist, PhD candidate, and employee at the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation:

From a phenomenological perspective, the difference between a space and a place is critical. People don’t live in a vacuum and we have to look at all aspects of the lived experience.

Do click the link above to read the entire piece. It’s a fascinating topic and well worth your time.

Feeling a bit stressed? Maybe this will help.

It’s true: The sound of nature helps us relax.  Researchers at the Brighton and Sussex Medical School (BSMS) have “found that playing ‘natural sounds’ affected the bodily systems that control the flight-or-fright and rest-digest autonomic nervous systems, with associated effects in the resting activity of the brain.” Science Daily reports that “[w]hile naturalistic sounds and ‘green’ environments have frequently been linked with promoting relaxation and wellbeing, until now there has been no scientific consensus as to how these effects come about.”

The researchers “conducted an experiment where participants listened to sounds recorded from natural and artificial environments,” during which their brain activity was measured and autonomic nervous system activity was monitored. The research team found that activity in the “default mode network of the brain (a collection of areas which are active when we are resting) was different depending on the sounds playing in the background.” Long and short, when listening to natural sounds “the brain connectivity reflected an outward-directed focus of attention,” whereas artificial sounds caused the brain connectivity to reflect “an inward-directed focus of attention, similar to states observed in anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder and depression.”  Interestingly, the change in brain activity depended on the participant’s stress level–those showing the greatest stress before the experiment “showed the greatest bodily relaxation when listening to natural sounds,” but those who were already relaxed showed “a slight increase in stress” when “listening to natural compared with artificial sounds.”

While helpful for treating people with anxiety, the study results will have a much greater reach. Science Daily notes that “the study of environmental exposure effects is of growing interest in physical and mental health settings, and greatly influences issues of public health and town planning.” Could a restful natural spot will be coming to your town?

Link via UK Noise Association.

Potential relief for those living near wind farms:

wind-turbines

Owl-inspired wing design reduces wind turbine noise by 10 decibels.  Some people living near wind farms have complained about health problems caused by the turbine noise.  While the debate continues as to whether the noise adversely affects human health, relief may be on its way.  Science Daily reports that a team of researchers studying the acoustics of owl flight have been working on pinpointing the mechanisms used by many species of owl that allows them “to hunt in effective silence by suppressing their noise at sound frequencies above 1.6 kilohertz (kHz) — over the range that can be heard by humans.”  The researchers wanted to use those mechanisms “to improve human-made aerodynamic design — of wind turbines, aircraft, naval ships and, even, automobiles”  And apparently they have succeeded in using owl feathers “as a model to inspire the design of a 3-D printed, wing attachment that reduces wind turbine noise by a remarkable 10 decibels — without impacting aerodynamics.”