Tag Archive: sound

The use of sound in medicine

Photo credit: Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensed under CC BY 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Sound has medical uses. Music therapy has been used for decades, as has diagnostic ultrasound, e.g., echocardiography, gallbladder, and kidney ultrasound, and therapeutic ultrasound has been used in physical therapy.

Now, this report from NPR discusses the use of focused sound waves to ablate damaged brain tissue, relieving a farmer of a trembling hand.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

The sounds of the unicorn of the sea

Alan Burdick, The New Yorker, writes about how researchers were able to tag six narwhals and capture the sounds they made over the course of the week, creating “an intimate sonic document of the life of the narwhal.” The researchers identified three types of sounds the narwhals make. The “first two, clicking and buzzing, are used to navigate and to hone in on prey,” and the third sound, calling, the researchers believe is used to communicate to one another. 

You can listen to them here.

 

“A Quiet Place” is so quiet

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that the audience is afraid of making noise. Reports have popped up saying the movie is so quiet that its audience is “too scared to eat their popcorn” because of the deafening silence. Not a bad thing in our book.

And apparently some others agree. Check out this review by Gary Thompson, The Philadelphia Inquirer: ‘A Quiet Place’: Aliens rid the earth of noisy people. Hear, hear.

 

 

Your outer ears are important to hearing, too

Photo credit: Travis Isaacs licensed under CC BY 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Those of us concerned about noise and hearing focus on noise damaging the inner ear and associated nerve structures, but the outer ear has an important role to play in hearing. It collects sound waves and directs them to the external auditory canal, but it also does more.

This report in the Science section of the New York Times discusses how the shape of the external ear helps humans determine exactly where a sound came from.

We can protect our hearing either by covering the pinna–the part of the external ear that we see–with ear muff hearing protection, or inserting ear plugs into the other part of the external ear, the external auditory canal. What’s important is to choose a method to protect your hearing and stick with it.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

This is fascinating

if a bit difficult for us non-STEM types to follow: Scientists can store light as sound moving us “[o]ne step closer to computers that process data at the speed of light.” According to Fiona MacDonald, Science Alert, storing “light-based information as sound waves on a computer chip…is critical if we ever want to shift from our current, inefficient electronic computers, to light-based computers that move data at the speed of light.”

And then our artificially intelligent robots can enslave us faster.

Still, the piece is interesting.  Click the first link to read the whole thing.