Tag Archive: sounds

The Sounds of Protest

Photo credit: John Hilliard licensed under CC BY 2.0

are getting louder. Alastair Boone, City Lab, writes about Stuart Fowkes, the founder of a new project called Protest and Politics, “a sound map that documents the sounds of protest, as they grow louder in cities around the world.” Boone reports that “from Brexit to Trump’s election, the past year has known more protests than many before it,” but he adds that Fowkes’ project includes sound from as early as the Gulf War in 1991.

Protest and Politics is part of a larger program founded by Fowkes, Cities and Memory, which is essentially a world sound map. What makes his new project different is that it is “the first to document the sounds of history.” “What’s great about this project is that it’s little slices of history,” Fowkes explains.

Listening to his recordings of protests in the United States, one can hear the same chants across the country. The “same sort of unity is present abroad,” where “casserole protesting, for example, using pots and pans to make noise in lieu of voice,” which originated in Latin America, is also heard in recordings from Europe and Canada.

Taken together, Fowkes hears “something of a unified voice that’s becoming stronger, becoming louder.” He concludes that “[m]ore and more, people feel like they’re part of something.” And that is what Fowkes hopes people take away from listening to his project. Says Fowkes, “I think there’s a general feeling that we need to rise up and make our voices heard.”

 

The world sounds different than it did a century ago

and it’s not for a good reason. Claire Asher, BBC, reports on how climate change and animal extinctions have altered the way our world sounds.  Asher writes that human activity is changing our natural soundscape irreversibly:

In 2015, a US team of scientists and engineers reported that the loudest sound in some waters now comes from millions of tiny bubbles, which are released by melting glaciers and icebergs. In the fjords of Alaska and Antarctica, the average noise level is now over 100 decibels – louder than any ocean environment recorded before.

And it is more than our oceans that are affected.  Asher notes that “natural spaces are now polluted with human-made noises. As we change forests into farms and drive species to extinction, we are fundamentally changing how our world sounds.”

Click the first link to read this interesting, if depressing, article.

Link via @jeaninebotta.

If you are in DC this week and want to find a quiet space,

Photo credit: Studio Simon Heijdens

head over to the Royal Netherlands Embassy and you’ll find the “Silent Room.” The Silent Room is an art installation by Simon Heijdens that he originally designed for the 2016 SXSW Festival. Heijdens said that during the festival there is too much noise and smells and people and sight, so he wanted to create a “black hole,” “somewhere where people could people can go inside, almost like a cold shower of silence.”  From the outside, his piece looks like an ordinary black shipping container, but inside “it’s a different world, devoid of sound and color.”  And he means completely.  Heijdens worked with a team of acoustic engineers to make “the padded, anechoic chamber that absorbs noise from the outside world. The result is complete, dead silence.”

“Silent Room” is open from noon to 2:00 p.m. through February 1st.  Click the link if you are interested in seeing it as you must RSVP for an invite.

 

Listen to the symphony of the natural world:

The Great Animal Orchestra, by Bernie Krause, musician, ecologist, soundscape recordist, and founder of Wild Sanctuary, an organization dedicated to recording and archiving natural soundscapes.

Thanks to London Sound Survey for the link.

Once you teach a computer to see,

Shhhh.  It can hear you.

Shhhh. It can hear you.

it can teach itself to hear.  MIT’s computer science department, “using software image-recognition to automate sound recognition,” found that “once software can use video analysis to decide what’s going on in a clip, it can then use that understanding to label the sounds in the clip, and thus accumulate a model for understanding sound, without a human having to label videos first for training purposes.”  And humans are rendered even more useless than before.

Link via @BoingBoing.