Tag Archive: taxis

T-coil makes the world more accessible for the hearing impaired

Terry Byrne, The Boston Globe, writes about how the New Repertory Theatre is helping the hearing impaired enjoy the theater.  Byrne reports that the New Repertory Theatre installed a new assistive listening system before the start of the fall season that uses a hearing induction loop that “directly and wirelessly receives amplified sound from the stage without background noise.”  Audience members with hearing aids or cochlear implants that have T-coil receivers can “simply press a button on their hearing aid to take advantage of the theater’s system.”

Kayla C. Leed, Mountain Xpress, reporting on a presentation by Juliette Sterkens, national hearing loop advocate for the nonprofit Hearing Loss Association of America, writes:

A hearing loop is a wire that circles a room and is connected to a sound system. The loop transmits the sound electromagnetically, and its signal is then picked up by the telecoil in the hearing aid or cochlear implant.”

Hearing loops are becoming more popular in the U.S., Sterkens pointed out. They’re available in airports, train stations, places of worship, stadiums, auditoriums, grocery store cash registers and libraries. New York City subway stations and taxis are required to have hearing loops installed.

Do you or someone you know have a hearing aid or cochlear implant with a T-coil receiver?  Download this loop finder app to help find nearby loop-enabled venues.

Thanks to Charles Shamoon for the links.

New York City reconsiders taxi tv screens

The New York Times reports that after almost a decade of being bombarded by unnecessary noise, taxi passengers may be given a reprieve.  Namely, it appears common sense may reign as the City’s Taxi and Limousine Commission may adopt a pilot program to remove the ubiquitous and annoying “Taxi TV from some cabs and replace it with more modern — and less intrusive — technology.”  This is welcome news for those of us who spend the first minutes in a cab struggling to find the right button to shut the tvs off.  One hopes that the pilot program will be successful and one less layer of noise and distraction will litter the city.

And no surprise, the cabbies are happy with the news too.  The New York Times reports that, “Bhairavi Desai, the executive director of the New York Taxi Workers Alliance, said the mood among drivers over the change was ‘utter elation.’  ‘The T.L.C. is eight years late in reversing a horrible decision,’ she said, ‘but we’re glad the time has finally come.’”

Thanks to Daniel Fink, M.D., a noise pollution activist in the Los Angeles area, for the link.  Dr. Fink serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association.