Tag Archive: The Hearing Journal

85 dB is not a safe noise level to prevent hearing loss

This image is in the public domain.

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

The title of my article in the January 2019 issue of The Hearing Journal says it all. No, 85 decibels (dB) is not a safe noise exposure level to prevent hearing loss.

In the absence of a federal guideline, recommendation, or standard for non-occupational noise exposure, the 85 dB (actually dBA, A-weighted to reflect the frequencies heard in human speech) occupational noise exposure standard seems to have become the de facto safe noise exposure standard in the U.S. and around the world.

This misunderstanding might be why the world has gotten noisier over the last four decades.

I hope those charged with protecting the public’s health–including the Centers for DC, FTC, Consumer Product Safety Commission, and state and local agencies–will take steps to protect the nation’s auditory health in 2019.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Can a machine learn to solve our speech in noise problem?

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This piece in The Hearing Journal asks, “Can a Machine Learn to Solve our Speech in Noise Problem?”

Maybe yes, maybe no.

The “speech in noise” problem is the difficulty many people with hearing loss–and even people with normal hearing as tested by pure tone audiometry–have  following a conversation if the room (often a restaurant or party) is noisy.

I have that problem, as many adults do, and I also have three problems with this article.

First, talking about a technological solution to the speech in noise problem without discussing how we can interfere with the development of this condition by simply making the world quieter to prevent hearing loss is irresponsible. Imagine public health officials in the 1950s focusing on making better wheelchairs, braces, and crutches for those affected by polio without also working to prevent polio by developing a vaccine. You can’t, because that would have be absurd. To prevent noise-induced hearing loss, we don’t need more research. We don’t need a vaccine. All we need is to make a quieter world, something that has been known for decades.

Second, an even better solution to the speech in noise problem would be to require quieter indoor spaces.

Third, requiring quieter public spaces is exactly what the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) requires. People with hearing loss clearly meet the ADA definition of having a disability, and they require “reasonable accommodations” to allow them to fully enjoy (yes, this is the legal standard in ADA) places open to the public. I will be speaking about “Disability Rights of Ambient Noise for People with Auditory Disabilities Under the Americans with Disabilities Act” at the December meeting of the Acoustical Society of America, in New Orleans. I recent learned that my talk will be broadcast live over the internet. Details of how to listen will be posted when they become available.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association, is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council, and is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

Attention commuters: put down your earbuds!

 

Photo credit: Pedro Figueiredo licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

A recent article in The Hearing Journal should give pause to mass transit commuters who use personal listening devices (PLDs) to mask background noise. Michelle Brady, AuD, Suzanne Miller, PhD, and Yula C. Serpanos, PhD, write that “[m]ass transit commuters are regularly exposed to excessive noise levels,” and note that use of PLDs “adds further stress on the auditory system as commuters listen at high volume levels to mask the background noise encountered during their daily commute.” By cranking the volume in areas of high noise, they note, commuters are “creating further risk of noise-induced hearing loss” (NIHL).

What makes NIHL insidious is that it “occurs in stages across several years,” and “[a]s such, its effects often go unnoticed.” Until they can’t be ignored, of course. The authors conducted a study on New York City commuters and found that “mass transit commuters in NYC do not completely understand the consequences of hearing loss and the proper use of PLDs.” They conclude that hearing health professionals need “to do a better job at educating the public about the risks of NIHL and safe listening habits.”

We agree that people need to be aware of the risks of NIHL, but also think there should be a role that government must play to protect citizens. And, of course, PLD manufacturers need to work with medical professionals and government to design safe PLDs that won’t deafen a generation.

 

What Your Patients Don’t Know Can Hurt Them

Photo Credit: Flávia Costa licensed under CC BY 3.0

By Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

It looks like the truth about noise-induced hearing loss is finally getting out.  This article in The Hearing Journal, which claims to be “the most respected journal in hearing health care,” discusses the fact that noise causes hearing loss.  While hardly an earth shattering assertion, the article notes that “[h]earing loss has long been thought to be an unpleasant but inevitable side effect of aging.”  But, the article continues, “within the past year, two reports from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have documented the startling degree to which noise—both in the workplace and elsewhere in our daily lives—contributes to hearing damage.”

What follows is a well-reasoned and complete discussion about noise-induced hearing loss. The article cites the new acting director of the CDC, Ann Schuchat, MD, and Rick Neitzel, PhD, the public health researcher and a co-founder of The Quiet Coalition. The only criticism I might offer is that the article doesn’t clearly state that the only safe noise level to prevent hearing loss is a daily average of 70 decibels time weighted average (see, “What Is a Safe Noise Level for the Public?“) and that the auditory injury threshold is only 75-78 A-weighted decibelsThose caveats aside, click the first link above to read the article.  It’s well worth your time.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area.  He serves on the board of the American Tinnitus Association and is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’s Health Advisory Council and the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America.

Here’s something positive to anticipate in the coming new year:

Will 2017 Produce a Hearing Breakthrough?  Michelle Perron, The Hearing Journal, writes about what we can anticipate in 2017, stating that “[f]rom reducing the severity of noise-induced hearing loss to restoring hearing via regrowth of stereocilia, hearing professionals have reasons to be hopeful in 2017 and beyond.”  Well, nice to read about something hopeful about 2017.