Tag Archive: World Hearing Day

World Hearing Day is March 3, 2021

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Each year the World Health Organization sponsors World Hearing Day, selecting a theme for that year’s event. Next year’s World Hearing Day on March 3, 2021, will mark the launch of the World Report on Hearing, and will be an opportunity to raise awareness of this topic among policymakers and the public. The theme for next year will be “Hearing Care for ALL!”

The WHO notes that:

  • Good hearing and communication are important at all stages of life.
  • Hearing loss and related ear diseases can be avoided through preventative actions such as: protection against loud sounds, good ear care practices, and immunization.
  • Hearing loss and related ear diseases can be addressed when it is identified in a timely manner and appropriate care sought.
  • People at risk of hearing loss should check their hearing regularly.
  • People having hearing loss or related ear diseases should seek care from a health care provider.

Our focus has been on prevention of hearing loss, not on treatment. In public health, prevention is almost always cheaper and better than treatment.

Treatment of hearing loss is currently limited to hearing aids or newer personal sound amplification products. Unfortunately, according to the World Bank approximately 10% of the world’s population lives on less than $2 a day, and 20% on less than $3.20 a day. Even the least expensive hearing aid is unaffordable for people living in poverty, and even if they were given one, batteries and maintenance would be problems.

When one is struggling to earn enough money to have food to eat, prevention of hearing loss is low down on the priority list. And in under-resourced populations, infections may be a greater cause of hearing difficulties than noise exposure. The ultimate solution will be elimination of poverty, but that may be a long time coming.

In the meantime, for those of us with adequate resources, remember that if it sounds loud, it’s too loud.

Avoid loud noise, wear hearing protection if you can’t, or face hearing loss later in life.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

March 3rd is World Hearing Day

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Each year the World Health Organization designates March 3 as World Hearing Day. WHO also chooses a theme each year. For this year’s World Hearing Day, the theme is “Don’t let hearing loss limit you. Hearing for life.”

In the United States, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention works with the WHO to help support and promote World Hearing Day, and The Quiet Coalition in turn works with CDC to help spread the word.

Our focus is on prevention of hearing loss and other auditory disorders like tinnitus and hyperacusis. We suggest installing a sound level meter on your smartphone. The app from CDC’s National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health is accurate and free.

But you don’t need a sound meter to know if it’s too loud. If you can’t carry on a conversation at the normal social distance of 3-4 feet, the ambient noise is above 75 A-weighted decibels* and your auditory health is in danger.

One simple rule can help preserve your hearing: if it sounds too loud, it IS too loud!

Turn down the volume of amplified sound, insert earplugs, leave the noisy environment, or be at risk for needing hearing aids later.

*A-weighting adjusts sound measurements for the frequencies heard in human speech.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Yesterday was World Hearing Day

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

The World Health Organization declared March 3, 2019, as World Hearing Day.

Each year the WHO selects a theme for its observation of this day. This year’s theme is early detection of hearing loss, and the WHO will release an online hearing test so you can screen your hearing.

It’s important to know if you have hearing loss, but it’s more important to prevent noise-induced hearing loss.

So remember: If something sounds too loud, it IS too loud! Avoid loud noise when you can, and when you can’t, wear hearing protection.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

It’s World Hearing Day!

By Daniel Fink, MD

Today, March 3, is World Hearing Day. This day is designated by the World Health Organization (WHO) to raise awareness and promote ear and hearing care around the world. The theme of this year’s World Hearing Day is “Action for Hearing Loss: Make a Sound Investment,” which aims to draw attention to the economic impact of hearing loss and cost effectiveness of interventions to address it.

I wish the WHO and the U.S. federal government paid a little more attention to prevention of hearing loss rather than dealing with the consequences after the damage has been done. The “public health mantra” is that prevention is better and cheaper than treatment, which in turn is better and cheaper than rehabilitation. I know that many people think hearing loss is part of normal aging, but several lines of evidence suggest that most hearing loss is caused by noise exposure. Presumably most people think they can just get a hearing aid when their hearing goes, unaware that hearing aids don’t work as well for hearing loss as eyeglasses work for presbyopia. And noise-induced hearing loss is entirely preventable–just avoid loud noise. If you can’t avoid noise, use earplugs.

Helen Keller said decades ago, “Blindness separates people from things. Deafness separates people from people.”  The New York Times recently had a column about blindness, the most dreaded physical disability.  If people were losing vision instead of losing hearing from noise exposure, people might be more concerned about our too noisy world.