Silencity

The Truth About Noise

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Dr. Arline Bronzaft on the Soundproofist podcast

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

The Quiet Coalition’s Arline Bronzaft, PhD, has been interviewed for the Soundproofist site, a site that provides interviews with individuals speaking about the welcoming sounds in our environment as well as the dangers of noise.

In this interview Dr. Bronzaft notes that the literature supporting the link between adverse impacts of noise on health and well-being has not resulted in legislation adequate to protect people from the dangers of noise. Her grandson, Matt Santoro, discusses how aircraft noise affects him at his home in Queens, New York, and how aircraft noise intruded  his classroom when he was in middle school.

For those like me, who prefer to get their information by reading rather than by listening to a podcast, a transcript of that podcast is also available at that site.

In either format, it’s worth spending the time to learn what Arline has to say about the dangers of noise.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Will our children suffer from hearing loss?

Photo credit: Luis Miguel Bugallo Sánchez  has dedicated this photo to the public domain

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Will America’s children suffer from hearing loss in the future like Flint, Michigan’s children are now suffering from neurological damage from lead poisoning? This recent report in The New York Times describes the long-term effects of lead poisoning on children in the Flint schools, and the great costs in trying to deal with these problems now.

The dangers to children’s hearing are well known. These include headphone use, noisy athletic events, noisy parties with amplified music at high volumes, band and musical instrument practices, and the much-too-loud soundtracks for action movies aimed at children.

It’s also well known that when children can’t hear, they have trouble learning. This evidence underlies the recommendations of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force for pediatric hearing screening.

But will those charged with protecting America’s children–the American Academy of Pediatrics, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Consumer Product Safety Commission, and the Federal Trade Commission’s Division of Advertising Practices among them–do more to prevent America’s children from suffering hearing loss? And when will they do it?

Because prevention of a medical problem is almost always better, cheaper, and more efficient than treating the problem after it has developed.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Prof. Rick Neitzel on Apple-backed research, restaurant noise

Photo credit: m01229 licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

by David M. Sykes, Vice Chair, The Quiet Coalition

Watch these two videos with our Quiet Coalition colleague, Professor Rick Neitzel, University of Michigan. In one video, he’s does some interesting noise-exposure work with a Canadian Broadcasting Corporation reporter in a news segment that aired recently:

The loudest sounds to which this reporter was exposed over the course of a full day were in restaurants during lunch and dinner! It certainly looks like the restaurant noise problem is gaining public attention.

In the other video, he’s announcing a very exciting new research project for which he’s received funding from Apple:

This study will use Apple’s new sound-exposure app on the iWatch & iPhone.

Congratulations, Prof. Neitzel!

David Sykes chairs several professional organizations in acoustical science: QCI Healthcare Acoustics Project, ANSI Committee S12-WG44, the Rothschild Foundation Task Force on Acoustics, and the FGI Acoustics Committee. He is lead author of “Sound & Vibration 2.0” (Springer, 2012), a contributor to the NAE’s “Technology for a Quieter America” and the GSA’s “Sound Matters,” and co-founded the Laboratory for Advanced Research in Acoustics at Rensselaer Polytech. A graduate of UC-Berkeley with advanced degrees from Cornell, he is a frequent organizer of professional conferences in the U.S., Europe, Asia and the Middle East.

Sleep may be good for your salary

Photo credit: Ivan Oboleninov from Pexels

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This fascinating article in The Ne York Times reports on a new study by economists showing that those who sleep more have higher salaries. The study correlated incomes with the earlier sunset times in the eastern end of a time zone compared to the western end, e.g., Boston, Massachusetts vs. Ann Arbor, Michigan, where there’s about a 50 minute difference between sunset times.

I wonder if another factor might be at work. Those who earn more can afford to live in quieter neighborhoods. Those who earn less can’t afford to do that. In fact, a study done by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, showed that noise pollution was worse in poor and minority communities.

Might the researchers have mixed up cause and effect? Probably not, because according to the report they looked at average incomes in the different areas in the same time zone.

But one does have to wonder.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Are we deafening our children?

Photo credit: M Pincus licesned under CC BY 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This review of headphones designed for toddlers and children states that the headphones have “a toddler-safe 75 decibel maximum, a hearing-health friendly 85 decibel maximum, and a louder 94 decibel maximum in-flight mode.” The reviewer goes on to state, “[w]e highly recommend that parents set the volume no louder than the 85 decibel mode for optimal hearing safety.” These statements document a complete misunderstanding of the dangers of loud noise for hearing and of children’s health. These headphones may be safer for children’s hearing than headphones without volume limits, which can put out 100-110 decibels (dB), but they are certainly not safe for children’s hearing.

To my knowledge, there are no studies of noise exposure and hearing loss in children. But children are not small adults, and noise exposure standards derived from studies on adults cannot be applied to them.

The 85 dB standard for safe listening is derived from the 85 A-weighted (dbA)* recommended exposure level for occupational noise. It is not a safe noise exposure for the public. The only evidence-based safe noise exposure limit to prevent hearing loss is a time-weighted average of 70 decibels for a day, and even that is probably too much noise exposure to prevent noise-induced hearing loss.

Let me state my thoughts as clearly as I can: A-weighted decibels typically measure 5-7 decibels lower than unweighted decibels. The 85 dBA noise exposure standard does not protect all exposed workers from occupational hearing loss over a 40-year work career, even with provision of hearing protection devices, strict monitoring, time limits for exposure, and regular audiograms, backed up by OSHA inspections and workers compensation law. Noise loud enough to deafen factory workers or heavy equipment operators over a 40-year career just isn’t safe for a little toddler’s delicate ears, which must last a whole lifetime, into her or his 80s or 90s.

The World Health Organization recommends only one hour exposure to 85 dBA noise because one hour at 85 dBA averages out to 70 dB for the day, even if there is zero noise for the other 23 hours, which is impossible.

In 2018, I was able to get the UK’s Advertising Standards Authority to take action agains Amazon because it was falsely advertising that headphones using the 85 dB volume limit were safe for children’s hearing. The Federal Trade Commission’s Division of Advertising Practices has declined to take enforcement action here, and the Consumer Product Safety Commission declined a request to require warning labels about possible auditory damage on headphones and personal music players. And the American Association of Pediatrics has also declined to issue advice for parents about noise exposure as strong as its recommendations against sun exposure.

Am I falsely alarmed? I don’t think so. A Dutch study in 2018 showed that children age 9-11 who used headphones already had signs of auditory damage, compared to those who didn’t.

Besides, children should be talking with other children, or with parents, grandparents, and others, not listening to music or the soundtracks of their screen devices. A recent study showed that screen time is correlated with brain changes in the tracts involving speech.

My advice to parents: no headphones and limit screen time. Protect your children’s ears and talk to them about why.

*A-weighting adjusts noise measurements for the frequencies heard in human speech.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

“Volume Control,” David Owen’s superb new book

by David M. Sykes, Vice Chair, The Quiet Coalition

David Owen is a wonderful essayist who writes for The New Yorker, so we at The Quiet Coalition were thrilled with his recent piece, “Is Noise Pollution The Next Big Public Health Crisis?” When he interviewed me, he mentioned that he had a book coming out soon on noise and health. It was released on October 29. Called “Volume Control: Hearing in a Deafening World,” Owen leads readers on an odyssey exploring the world of hearing loss in America.

If you are concerned that noise pollution really is the next big public health crisis–the new secondhand smoke–get a copy of this book and read it.

My hope is that Owen’s book will crack open wider public interest in this subject, one that already affects 48 million Americans. If you haven’t already seen Owen’s video on the subject which followed his New Yorker essay, watch it now.

David Sykes chairs several professional organizations in acoustical science: QCI Healthcare Acoustics Project, ANSI Committee S12-WG44, the Rothschild Foundation Task Force on Acoustics, and the FGI Acoustics Committee. He is lead author of “Sound & Vibration 2.0” (Springer, 2012), a contributor to the NAE’s “Technology for a Quieter America” and the GSA’s “Sound Matters,” and co-founded the Laboratory for Advanced Research in Acoustics at Rensselaer Polytech. A graduate of UC-Berkeley with advanced degrees from Cornell, he is a frequent organizer of professional conferences in the U.S., Europe, Asia and the Middle East.

Univ. of Texas band members now wear ear plugs

Photo credit: Klobetime licensed under CC By-SA 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This article in The Daily Texan reports that Longhorn Band members now wear earplugs.

Noise-induced hearing loss in musicians of all types is an occupational or recreational hazard, regardless of what instrument or type of music one plays. In fact, music students have been used as subjects in studies of the effect of noise exposure on hearing, compared to those studying other subjects.

My advice is simple: all musicians–in high school and college bands and at the professional level–should use hearing protection.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Engineers on noise pollution

by David M. Sykes, Vice Chair, The Quiet Coalition

You might wonder whtether engineers are interested in America’s noise problem? According to Interesting Engineering, the answer is yes—and they can help you.

When you’re ready to address a noise problem in your city, town, townhouse, house, or apartment complex, these are the kinds of people you should call. In America, there are three engineering societies whose members specialize in noise control and acoustics:

  1. The National Council of Acoustical Consultants (NCAC),
  2. The Institute of Noise Control Engineering (INCE), and
  3. The Acoustical Society of America (ASA), the premier international scientific and research society in this field, which publishes the world’s leading peer-reviewed journal in Acoustical Science, The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America.

David Sykes chairs several professional organizations in acoustical science: QCI Healthcare Acoustics Project, ANSI Committee S12-WG44, the Rothschild Foundation Task Force on Acoustics, and the FGI Acoustics Committee. He is lead author of “Sound & Vibration 2.0” (Springer, 2012), a contributor to the NAE’s “Technology for a Quieter America” and the GSA’s “Sound Matters,” and co-founded the Laboratory for Advanced Research in Acoustics at Rensselaer Polytech. A graduate of UC-Berkeley with advanced degrees from Cornell, he is a frequent organizer of professional conferences in the U.S., Europe, Asia and the Middle East.

David Owen’s new book on how noise is destroying our hearing

Photo by Laurie Gaboardi, courtesy of David Owen

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

NPR interviews New Yorker staff writer David Owen about his new book, “Volume Control.” Owen makes several salient points:

  • Hearing loss in old age is the result of cumulative noise exposure.
  • Hearing loss doesn’t just affect hearing, but affects general health and function. People with hearing loss have more frequent hospitalizations, more accidents, and die younger.
  • Hearing loss and tinnitus are the leading service-connected disabilities for military veterans.
  • There is no cure for tinnitus and hyperacusis can be an even worse problem, without treatment or cure.

My advice is that you must protect your hearing. Because if something sounds too loud, it is too loud.

We only have two ears. Wear earplugs now, or hearing aids later.

DISCLOSURE: I was interviewed by David Owen for his The New Yorker article, “Is Noise Pollution the Next Big Public-Health Crisis?,” and I am acknowledged in his book.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.

Controlling the roar of the crowd

Photo credit: Gloria Bell licensed under CC BY 2.0

by Daniel Fink, MD, Chair, The Quiet Coalition

This article in The New York Times describes efforts by the Philadelphia Eagles and other professional and college sports teams to accommodate those with sensory challenges, “who can be most acutely affected by the overwhelming environments.”

Noise levels in many arenas and stadiums are high enough to cause auditory damage. The world record stadium noise is 142.2 A-weighted decibels (dBA)*, which exceeds the OSHA maximum permissible occupational noise exposure level of 140 dBA.

We wish the sports teams and the arenas and stadiums in which they play would do more to protect the hearing of everyone attending the game.

And since they probably won’t do this–crowd noise is weaponized to favor the home team, especially in football where it interferes with the visiting team hearing the quarterback calling the play–the public health authorities should step in.

*A-weighting adjusts sound measurements for the frequencies heard in human speech.

Dr. Daniel Fink is a leading noise activist based in the Los Angeles area. He is the founding chair of The Quiet Coalition, an organization of science, health, and legal professionals concerned about the impacts of noise on health, environment, learning, productivity, and quality of life in America. Dr Fink also is the interim chair of Quiet Communities’ Health Advisory Council, and he served on the board of the American Tinnitus Association from 2015-2018.